Hawk found with nail in head recovering in Calif.

Oct 24, 2011
A wildlife rescue group captures a red-tailed hawk in a San Francisco park that appears to have been shot in the head with a nail gun. Rebecca Dmytryk, executive director of the Monterey-based group WildRescue, says the juvenile bird was trapped Saturday Oct. 22, 2011 shortly before sunset at the San Francisco Botanical Gardens. The bird was immediately transported to Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley in San Jose. (AP Photo/Katerine Ulrich - WildRescue)

(AP) -- A red-tailed hawk that rescuers said was shot in the head with a nail gun was recovering Sunday at a Northern California wildlife center.

The hawk, captured in a San Francisco park by rescuers Saturday, was doing "very well" while being cared for at the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley in San Jose, said Rebecca Dmytryk, executive director of the Monterey-based group WildRescue.

"The nail dislodged and dropped out during transport with no sign of additional trauma and no bleeding," Dmytryk said.

The juvenile bird was trapped Saturday evening at the San Francisco Botanical Gardens. It was immediately transported to the wildlife center where specialists stayed late to receive it, Dmytryk said.

WildRescue had been notified of the injured bird nearly a week ago and had tried to trap it several times last week without success.

But observers got close enough to the bird to see the nail extending from its cheek through the front of its head. They said the hawk appeared to be in pain.

Dmytryk's group had been using a trap called a bal-chatri, a trap made of wire mesh, to try to catch the injured hawk.

believe someone intentionally hurt the earlier this month. A reward of $10,000 has been offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whomever harmed the bird.

She has said that like hawks are protected, and that it's a felony to try to capture the without a license.

Explore further: Birds 'weigh' peanuts and choose heavier ones

0 shares

Related Stories

Audubon refuge going strong

Jul 24, 2006

Mill Grove, in Audubon, Pa., the first U.S. home of John James Audubon in the early 1800s, still provides sanctuary for birds and bird lovers.

Boy or girl? Understanding how red-tailed hawks migrate

Jun 27, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- As any resident of upstate New York will tell you, the red-tailed hawk is the most common hawk in North America. Often seen perched on light and telephone poles along major highways, this ...

Recommended for you

Birds 'weigh' peanuts and choose heavier ones

6 hours ago

Many animals feed on seeds, acorns or nuts. The common feature of these are that they have shells and there is no direct way to know what's inside. How do the animals know how much and what quality of food ...

Estuaries protect Dungeness crabs from deadly parasites

May 22, 2015

Parasitic worms can pose a serious threat to the Dungeness crab, a commercially important fishery species found along the west coast of North America. The worms are thought to have caused or contributed to ...

An evolutionary heads-up—the brain size advantage

May 22, 2015

A larger brain brings better cognitive performance. And so it seems only logical that a larger brain would offer a higher survival potential. In the course of evolution, large brains should therefore win ...

Our bond with dogs may go back more than 27,000 years

May 21, 2015

Dogs' special relationship to humans may go back 27,000 to 40,000 years, according to genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 21. Earlier genome ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.