Google insists newspapers not losing out to Internet

Oct 14, 2011
Internet search engine Google has insisted it was not stealing business from the print media even if it has become an increasingly important source of news on the Web.

Internet search engine Google insisted on Friday it was not stealing business from the print media even if it has become an increasingly important source of news on the Web.

"We are not making money on the back of newspapers," Stefan Tweraser, head of Google Germany, told a media industry conference in Vienna.

The company pays around six billion US dollars (4.35 billion euros) for news services worldwide and draws content from some 50,000 publishing companies around the world, Tweraser said at the annual gathering of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).

"Google's real business model is partnerships... Google News lives because we have 50,000 partners with whom we share our revenues."

Dismissing criticism that Google, as an aggregator of , held a de facto monopoly over news on the Web, Tweraser pointed to fellow search engines Yahoo! and Bing, as well as local competitors in Russia and China.

"So there are a lot of alternatives to Google," he said.

reported on Thursday a big jump in profits in the three months to September as its budding online social network blossomed and Android smartphones gained traction.

Net profit rose to $2.73 billion on the wings of online that soared to $9.72 billion in the third quarter, which ended September 30.

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that_guy
not rated yet Oct 14, 2011
The premise that newspapers are not losing out to the internet is absolutely redonkulous.

It's sad that the newspapers are dying, but the truth is that print media is a terribly inefficient method (using paper and ink resources) of delivering the news relative to the internet and TV. Period. Now that I can access news sites easily from my phone, I have no reason to grab a paper. Simple.

The news will consolidate into a few local operations, instead of 4 papers and 5 news programs for every city...(Really, How many different places need to report farmer jones saving the cat in his neighbors tree) and it will diversify as blogs offer different opinions/angles on the news. I'm not happy with all the changes per se, but this is the natural progression.

The smart news outfits have great websites, TV news programs, and have helped render the obselete paper unnecessary.

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