G299.2-2.9, a middle-aged supernova remnant

Oct 13, 2011
Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U.Texas/S. Park et al, ROSAT; Infrared: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

(PhysOrg.com) -- G299.2-2.9 is an intriguing supernova remnant found about 16,000 light years away in the Milky Way galaxy. Evidence points to G299.2-2.9 being the remains of a Type Ia supernova, where a white dwarf has grown sufficiently massive to cause a thermonuclear explosion.

Because it is older than most caused by these explosions, at an age of about 4,500 years, G299.2-2.9 provides astronomers with an excellent opportunity to study how these objects evolve over time. It also provides a probe of the explosion that produced this structure.

This composite image shows G299.2-2.9 in X-ray light from Chandra and the ROSAT satellite, in orange, that has been overlaid on an infrared image from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey, or 2MASS. The faint X-ray emission from the inner region reveals relatively large amounts of iron and silicon, as expected for a remnant of a Type Ia supernova. The outer shell of the remnant is complex, with at least a double shell structure. Typically, such a complex outer shell is associated with a star that has exploded into space where gas and dust are not uniformly distributed.

Since most theories to explain Type Ia supernovas assume they go off in a uniform environment, detailed studies of this complicated outer shell should help astronomers improve their understanding of the environments where these explosions occur. It is very important to understand the details of Type Ia explosions because astronomers use them as cosmic mile markers to measure the accelerated expansion of the universe and study dark energy. The discovery of this accelerated expansion in the late 1990s led to the recent award of the .

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omatumr
2 / 5 (8) Oct 13, 2011
. . . a double shell structure . . . such a complex outer shell is associated with a star that has exploded into space where gas and dust are not uniformly distributed


Thanks for the intriguing story.

There is also "a double shell structure" of material orbiting the Sun.

The inner shell consists mostly of Fe, O, Ni, Si, S, Mg and Ca.

The outer shell consists mostly of H, He, C, and N.

Linked chemical and isotopic anomalies from these two shells

www.omatumr.com/D...Data.htm

Were the first hint that the Sun is the remains of a supernova

http://www.omatum...igin.htm

And neutron repulsion is the energy source

http://www.omatum...Data.htm

That sustains our lives and powers Earth's climate, the Sun and the cosmos [1,2].

1. Super-fluidity in the solar interior: Implications for solar eruptions and climate

http://arxiv.org/.../0501441

2. Neutron repulsion

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

jmcanoy1860
5 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2011
Hey, Oliver, after sodomizing your own children perhaps you could just explain 3 things for me.
1. Solar absorption spectra
2. Where you get the idea that there is matter comprised of 100% neutrons anywhere in the universe.
3. Where there is any evidence from someone other than yourself.
jmcanoy1860
5 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2011
Actually, one more thing there Oli. What exactly is the time frame for the dissipation of condensed neutrons?