ESA To Collaborate with NASA on Solar Science Mission

Oct 06, 2011
This is an artist's concept of the Solar Orbiter viewing the sun. Credit: Image courtesy of ESA

On October 4, 2011, the European Space Agency announced it's two next science missions, including Solar Orbiter, a spacecraft geared to study the powerful influence of the sun. Solar Orbiter will be an ESA-led mission, with strong NASA contributions managed from Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Solar Orbiter will venture closer to the Sun than any previous mission. The spacecraft will also carry advanced instrumentation that will help untangle how activity on the sun sends out radiation, particles and magnetic fields that can affect Earth's magnetic environment, causing aurora, or potentially damaging satellites, interfering with GPS communications or even Earth's electrical .

"Solar Orbiter will use multiple gravity assists from Venus to tilt its orbit until it can see the poles of the Sun, and that's never been done before," said Chris St. Cyr, NASA's project scientist for Solar Orbiter at Goddard. "A full view of the solar poles will help us understand how the sun's reverse direction every 11 years, causing giant eruptions and flares, called , that can affect the rest of the solar system."

Being so close to the sun also means that the Solar Orbiter will stay over a given area of the for a longer time, allowing the instruments to track the evolution of sunspots, active regions, coronal holes and other far longer than has been done before.

Solar Orbiter is also designed to make major breakthroughs in our understanding of how the sun generates and propels the flow of particles in which the planets are bathed, known as the solar wind. Solar activity and solar eruptions create strong perturbations in this wind, triggering spectacular auroral displays on Earth and other planets. Solar Orbiter will be close enough to the sun to both observe the details of how the solar wind is accelerated off the sun and to sample the wind shortly after it leaves the surface.

The mission's launch is planned for 2017 from Cape Canaveral, Florida aboard a NASA-provided launch vehicle. Solar Orbiter will be placed into an elliptical orbit around the sun. Its closest approach will be near the orbit of Mercury, 75% of the distance between Earth and the sun - some 21,000,000 miles away from the sun's surface.

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omatumr
1 / 5 (7) Oct 07, 2011
ESA To Collaborate with NASA on Solar Science Mission


Sounds great, if they can avoid being puppets of world leaders that controlled the SOHO-ACE Work­shop on Solar and Galactic Composition in Bern, SWITZERLAND on March 6-9, 2001.

Here's my abstract [1]. The Proceedings [2] have a section saying iron (Fe) canntnot be the most abundant element in the interior of the Sun!

It is, but my paper with the experimental data was excluded from the Proceeding.

Many of the data are here [3].

New, free, on-line e-books [4] and articles may end Big Brother's tyrannical control of information and people

1. Solar abundances of the elements
www.omatumr.com/soho.prn.pdf

2. Solar and galactic composition
http://adsabs.har...98..357B

3. Composition of the solar interior
www.omatumr.com/a...2002.pdf

4. Origin of elements in the solar system
http://ebookee.or...099.html

OKM
jsdarkdestruction
5 / 5 (2) Oct 07, 2011
yeah, of course its all a conspiracy against you and neutron repulsion.
Ethelred
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 08, 2011
Since Oliver has claimed he would answer questions
I will respond to questions, as time permits, but I do not have time to argue with those who will not read information published in peer-reviewed papers [1-6]
I have read them and he knows it. Clearly he has ample time considering the number of posts he makes has been increasing.

Where is evidence for Iron in the those solar flare images you like to use? They only have TRACES of iron.

Where is the evidence that neutrons repel each other in a way that is different from the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

Where is someone that supports your idea that the Sun is a pulsar? And how did that a pulsar form IF there is such a thing as neutron repulsion?

Since you are now claiming that neutron repulsion can blow galaxies apart how did they form in the first place since with neutron repulsion of that magnitude even stars WITH neutron stars in them could not form nor could they retain planets.

The papers do NOT cover these.

Ethelred
Ethelred
1 / 5 (1) Oct 08, 2011
Double post. Sorry.

Ethelred