Dutch to unveil alcohol immobilisers in cars

Oct 05, 2011

Drivers caught from December with a blood alcohol content of more than 1.3 grammes per litre will be forced to have breathalyser immobilisers in their cars, the Dutch Infrastructure Ministry said Wednesday.

"With the breathalyser programme, the minister wants to reduce the number of in which alcohol plays a role," it said in a press release.

The plan is to reduce road deaths by five or six per year, the ministry said. In the Netherlands, about 130 people died in alcohol-related traffic accidents last year.

The immobiliser connected to the car's circuit will prevent drivers from starting the engine if they have a blood-alcohol level of more than 0.2g/litre. The Dutch maximum limit is 0.5 g/l.

"The driver must not only blow into the before ignition, but also several times while the car is moving," the statement said.

should also be trained to realise the dangers of drinking and driving.

"Violators will be billed between 1,500 and 2,000 euros ($2,000 and $2,700) for the installment of the immobilisers and training and will also have to buy a special driver's licence," ministry spokesman Elif Hagci told AFP.

If drivers refuse to have the device installed, their licences will be revoked for a minimum of five years.

Other countries including France, the United States, Canada and Australia and Sweden have developed similar programmes.

Explore further: Robot sub returns to water after first try cut short (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Toyota developing anti-drunk driving gadget

Aug 31, 2009

Toyota Motor said Monday it was developing anti-drunk driving equipment that would lock the ignition of a vehicle if high levels of alcohol are detected in the driver.

Tired drivers as bad as drunk drivers

Jan 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- New research shows that driving for only three hours at night has a similar effect to driving under the influence of alcohol, and even two hours can be equivalent to a couple of drinks.

Zero tolerance, zero effect: Stats show laws 'inert'

Sep 16, 2009

As college administrators, social scientists and law enforcement officials across the country continue to debate whether the drinking age should be 18 instead of 21, a Sam Houston State University economist challenges a related ...

Inexperience a key factor in youth crashes

Sep 02, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A University of Adelaide (Australia) study has found that young drivers are twice as likely to have an accident during their first few months of driving on a provisional licence than after ...

Recommended for you

Gaza cops trade bullets for laser-tech in training

Apr 14, 2014

Security forces in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip are using technology to practice shooting on laser simulators, saving money spent on ammunition in the cash-strapped Palestinian territory.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

Making 'bucky-balls' in spin-out's sights

(Phys.org) —A new Oxford spin-out firm is targeting the difficult challenge of manufacturing fullerenes, known as 'bucky-balls' because of their spherical shape, a type of carbon nanomaterial which, like ...

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...