Disgraced Korean scientist unveils cloned coyotes

Oct 17, 2011
South Korea's disgraced cloning expert Hwang Woo-Suk (C) walks into a court in Seoul in 2009. Hwang was a national hero until some of his research into creating human stem cells from a cloned embryo was found to be faked.

Disgraced South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-Suk unveiled eight cloned coyotes Monday in a project sponsored by a provincial government.

Hwang delivered the clones to a wild animal shelter at Pyeongtaek, 50 kilometres (35 miles) south of Seoul, in a ceremony chaired by Gyeonggi province governor Kim Moon-Soo, Kim's office said.

Hwang was a national hero until some of his research into creating human stem cells from a cloned embryo was found to be faked.

But his work in creating Snuppy, the world's first cloned dog, in 2005 has been verified by experts and authorities.

Under a joint project with the province to clone , Hwang took cells from the skin of a coyote, Kim's office said in a statement.

He transplanted their nuclei into a dog's eggs from which the canine nucleus had been removed, it said, adding the first clone was born on June 17.

In a Twitter message, the governor praised Hwang for what he called the world's first use of such a technique. "The cloning of an African wild dog is under way, and we will attempt to clone a mammoth in the future," Kim said.

South Korean experts have previously cloned animals including a cow, a cat, dogs, a pig and a wolf. The cloned wolf died in 2009.

Hwang shot to fame in 2004 when he published a paper in the US claiming to have created the world's first stem-cell line from a cloned human embryo.

But his reputation was tarnished in November 2005 by allegations that he had violated by accepting human eggs from his own researchers.

In January 2006 an investigative team ruled that his findings were faked and said he had produced no of any kind.

In 2009 Hwang received a two-year suspended sentence for embezzling research funds and ethical lapses in obtaining . Last December an appeals court reduced the penalty to an 18-month suspended sentence.

Explore further: Improving the productivity of tropical potato cultivation

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Conviction of disgraced SKorean scientist upheld

Dec 16, 2010

(AP) -- An appeals court ruled Thursday to uphold most of the fraud convictions against a South Korean scientist disgraced in a cloning scandal that shook the international scientific community.

S. Korea to revive stem cell research after scandal

Sep 19, 2011

President Lee Myung-Bak promised Monday to spend some $89 million restoring South Korea's reputation as a leader in stem cell research, five years after a scandal tarnished its reputation.

Recommended for you

Building better soybeans for a hot, dry, hungry world

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —A new study shows that soybean plants can be redesigned to increase crop yields while requiring less water and helping to offset greenhouse gas warming. The study is the first to demonstrate ...

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...

Chrono, the last piece of the circadian clock puzzle?

Apr 15, 2014

All organisms, from mammals to fungi, have daily cycles controlled by a tightly regulated internal clock, called the circadian clock. The whole-body circadian clock, influenced by the exposure to light, dictates the wake-sleep ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...