Invention unravels mystery of protein folding

Sep 14, 2011

An Oak Ridge National Laboratory invention able to quickly predict three-dimensional structure of protein could have huge implications for drug discovery and human health.

While scientists have long studied structure and the mechanism of folding, this marks the first time they are able to computationally predict three-dimensional structure independent of size of the protein. Because the invention also determines possible intermediate states in the protein folding process, it provides a clearer picture and could open doors to designing new medicines for that are caused by incorrectly folded proteins.

Pratul Agarwal, inventor of the method and a member of the Department of Energy lab's Computer Science and Mathematics Division, believes this new method will provide benefits in many areas.

"This finding is relevant to energy, climate and health, which are all of tremendous significance today," Agarwal said. "We expect this approach to have many industrial applications through , for example, where we expect to be able to design more efficient enzymes."

Proteins often adopt a three-dimensional structure that allows them to carry out their designated function, but such a structure has provided a computationally challenging task. Using the fundamental insights of the protein structure, dynamics and function, the ORNL invention discloses a unique computational methodology to explore the conformational energy landscape of a protein.

"One of the main advantages of this approach is that it follows the natural intrinsic dynamics of the protein and by promoting the relevant dynamical modes allows rapid exploration of the folding pathway and prediction of the ," Agarwal said.

In the area of drug development, Agarwal, a computational biophysicist, expects this discovery to help in the development of treatments with little or no side effects.

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More information: This work is reflected in two recent papers published in PLoS ONE ("Discovering conformational sub-states relevant to protein function") and The Journal of Physical Chemistry B ("Redox-Promoting Protein Motions in Rubredoxin").

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kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (3) Sep 14, 2011
This is such an excellent, ground-breaking piece of work, the enormous benefits can hardly be quantified.

Just so by the way - it of course points to the fact that no random evolutionary process could have constructed the proteins to fold is such a way as to support the functions of life.
IN fact given the whole reason for this research, it's clear that blundering, random mistakes cause disease and distress to the living organism - it doesn't result in new super functionality and better performing structures. It KILLS.
kochevnik
5 / 5 (1) Sep 14, 2011
Just so by the way - it of course points to the fact that no random evolutionary process could have constructed the proteins to fold is such a way as to support the functions of life.
Shouldn't scientific heresy be punishable by burning at the stake, as you fellow christopaths did to scientists?