TechCrunch founder starts venture capital fund

September 2, 2011

(AP) -- Michael Arrington, founder of popular tech blog TechCrunch, is starting a venture capital firm with an initial $20 million to invest in the same kinds of startups that TechCrunch often covers.

The fund's investors include tech company AOL Inc., which bought last year for an undisclosed amount, and a number of prominent venture capital firms such as Greylock partners, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Sequoia Capital.

Arrington will be heading up the fund with Patrick Gallagher, who is a partner at VantagePoint Capital Partners.

According to a media reports, Arrington will no longer be TechCrunch's editor, but his involvement in the site beyond that remains unclear. AOL did not respond to multiple requests for comment Friday.

Explore further: 575-million-dollar fund targets technology startups


Related Stories

AOL to buy tech blog TechCrunch

September 28, 2010

(AP) -- AOL Inc. said Tuesday that it will buy technology blog TechCrunch and its sister sites for an undisclosed amount in a bid to expand its news production.

Groupon raises $950 mln in new funding

January 10, 2011

Internet bargain coupon phenomenon Groupon said Monday it had raised $950 million in the past month to invest in technology, fund its global expansion and compensate company employees and early investors.

Recommended for you

Roboticists learn to teach robots from babies

December 1, 2015

Babies learn about the world by exploring how their bodies move in space, grabbing toys, pushing things off tables and by watching and imitating what adults are doing.

Xbox gaming technology may improve X-ray precision

December 1, 2015

With the aim of producing high-quality X-rays with minimal radiation exposure, particularly in children, researchers have developed a new approach to imaging patients. Surprisingly, the new technology isn't a high-tech, high-dollar ...

Making 3-D imaging 1,000 times better

December 1, 2015

MIT researchers have shown that by exploiting the polarization of light—the physical phenomenon behind polarized sunglasses and most 3-D movie systems—they can increase the resolution of conventional 3-D imaging devices ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.