A scientific 'go' for commercial production of vitamin-D enhanced mushrooms

September 7, 2011

A new commercial processing technology is suitable for boosting the vitamin D content of mushrooms and has no adverse effects on other nutrients in those tasty delicacies, the first study on the topic has concluded. The technology, which involves exposing mushrooms to the same kind of ultraviolet light that produces suntans, can greatly boost mushrooms' vitamin D content. It appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Ryan Simon and colleagues note that many people do not get enough vitamin D in their diets. Few natural foods are high in the vitamin, and there are limits on what foods can be fortified to boost the vitamin D content. Although few people realize it, mushrooms are an excellent natural source of vitamin D. Some producers have embraced results of earlier studies, suggesting that exposing mushrooms to ultraviolet B (UVB) light can significantly boost the vitamin D content.

The scientists set out to answer several questions about commercial-scale UV light processing of mushrooms. Among them: Does it produce consistently high levels of vitamin D and does it adversely affect other nutrients in mushrooms? They compared button mushrooms exposed to UVB light, those exposed to natural sunlight and those kept in the dark. The UVB-exposed mushrooms got a dramatic boost in (700 percent more of the vitamin than those mushrooms exposed to no light) and the UVB processing had no effect on levels of vitamin C, , riboflavin, niacin and a host of other .

Explore further: Button mushrooms contain as much anti-oxidants as expensive ones

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4 comments

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that_guy
not rated yet Sep 07, 2011
They're magically delicious and nutritious, instead of just plain old magic mushrooms
OldBlackCrow
5 / 5 (1) Sep 07, 2011
Just what I was thinking. |-)
deatopmg
1 / 5 (2) Sep 07, 2011
It's D2, NOT D3! D2 is useless in most animal species and marginally effective in humans. But never mind the facts, it's a "great" selling point for the patented mushrooms.
jdbertron
1 / 5 (1) Sep 08, 2011
How about stepping outside in the sun for 5 minutes ?

First we get scared of skin cancer, so instead we slap chemicals on our skin for the sun to bake-in - that won't get you cancer right ?
Then we don't get enough sun, so we eat vitamin D enhanced mushrooms to get enough vitamin D, that won't get you cancer either right ?.
Wow. How stupid have we become ?
Six million years of evolution without sunscreen and all of a sudden the sun's going to kill you ?

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