Scab resistance in durum wheat

Sep 16, 2011

Durum wheat is a valuable cereal crop widely used for human consumption in the United States, Canada, and several European countries. Scab or Fusarium head blight is one of the crop's most serious diseases, reducing its grain yield and quality. Current durum cultivars don't have resistance to this widespread disease.

While working on the Durum Germplasm Enhancement Project (DGE), Dr. Prem Jauhar and staff at the USDA-ARS Northern Crop Research Laboratory, Fargo, ND discovered that a diploid wheatgrass contains the genes needed for scab resistance. The team produced a new wheat line called DGE-1 by incorporating a specific wheatgrass chromosome 1E into durum cultivars. Released in 2008, the DGE-1 line has 30 chromosomes, 28 coming from durum wheat and a pair from wheat grass. This is the first time a wheat line with enhanced scab tolerance was produced by Dr. Jauhar's DGE project.

For stable scab resistance, however, it's necessary to transfer the from the added wheatgrass chromosome into related durum wheat chromosomes. This transfer is most likely to occur when the chromosomes are in a single dose, but normally chromosomes are in pairs. Through several crosses involving the DGE-1 line, Dr. Jauhar was able to produce hybrid strains of durum wheat in which the grass chromosome 1E substituted its counterparts 1A and 1B of durum wheat. Jauhar's team used a technique to identify wheatgrass chromosomes incorporated into durum. By using for these specific chromosomes, the scientists were able to identify these chromosomes rapidly and economically.

"These studies on chromosome engineering will help bring about genomic reconstruction that will have far-reaching implications in both basic and applied research on wheat," said Jauhar. This research is ongoing in the Cereal Crops Research Unit of the USDA-ARS Northern Laboratory in Fargo.

Explore further: International team completes genome sequence of centipede

More information: www.crops.org/publications/tpg/articles/4/2/102

Provided by American Society of Agronomy

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers develop highest yielding salt tolerant wheat

Apr 15, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a major breakthrough for wheat farmers in salt-affected areas, CSIRO researchers have developed a salt tolerant durum wheat that yields 25 per cent more grain than the parent variety in ...

Researchers developing better wheat

Feb 16, 2006

Eighteen universities across the United States are combining desirable genes from different varieties of wheat to make better and more competitive varieties.

Researchers find rust resistance genes in wild grasses

Oct 21, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- University of Adelaide researchers have identified new sources of stem and leaf rust resistance in wild grass relatives of wheat sourced mostly from the 'fertile crescent' of the Middle East.

Recommended for you

Cataloguing 10 million human gut microbial genes

18 hours ago

Over the past several years, research on bacteria in the digestive tract (gut microbiome) has confirmed the major role they play in our health. An international consortium, in which INRA participates, has developed the most ...

New device could make large biological circuits practical

Nov 24, 2014

Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits—systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular ...

Model evaluates where bioenergy crops grow best

Nov 24, 2014

Farmers interested in bioenergy crops now have a resource to help them determine which kind of bioenergy crop would grow best in their regions and what kind of harvest to expect.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.