Peacekeeping creatures help maintain woodland diversity

Sep 20, 2011

Common woodland creatures, including woodlice, millipedes and worms, can help ensure the survival of weaker species of woodland fungi, according to new research from Cardiff University.

Huge fungal networks, often stretching over several hectares of woodland, compete with each other for space and resources and, now, findings have shown that invertebrates living on the woodland floor have the potential to govern the outcome of these battles.

Likening what happens in woodlands to the popular Nintendo Wii game, Spore Wars, Ph.D student Tom Crowther's study has just been published in the international journal . His findings reveal that, by feeding on the most combative fungi, invertebrates ensure that less competitive species are not entirely destroyed or digested.

Tom said, "By not allowing the most dominant fungus to destroy all opponents, fungal diversity is maintained within the woodland. This is an important process as fungi are responsible for maintaining and fertility, allowing our native trees and plants to grow, and the woodland itself to function.

"We also know that the diversity of organisms plays a major role in determining . In many ways, what happens in the woodland is very much like the game Spore Wars. Without these invertebrates acting as peacekeepers, many important would be displaced reducing fungal diversity and ultimately affecting the cycling and recycling of nutrients within the soil."

Tom, a student at the Cardiff School of Biosciences, based his work on laboratory microcosm studies, developed with his Ph.D supervisors, Professor Lynne Boddy and Dr Hefin Jones.

The study is the first to show how predicted changes in soil fauna, as a result of current climate change, may potentially have major consequences for the functioning of Britain's woodland ecosystems.

Considering the implications of the results, Tom said, "It's possible that what we've seen happen in woodland may also take place in all other soil environments. Soil invertebrates may not only be important in ensuring the health of our forests by maintaining fungal diversity, they may also be crucial for our garden and agricultural soils."

Explore further: Biologist reels in data to predict snook production

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Kev_C
not rated yet Sep 21, 2011
It proves that biodiversity and the protection of the microorganisms is important to overall ecosystem health and viability. Its bad enough having mono-cultures on farms without the same thing happening in woodlands because of overspraying of pesticides and the flow of contaminants through the water course from chemical agriculture. Maybe this research can be extended to include meadow pastures which have existed for many centuries to see if a similar meadow based heirachy exists?