NASA: Satellite pieces to hit Earth in a week

Sep 16, 2011

(AP) -- U.S. space officials say they expect a dead satellite to fall to Earth in about a week.

NASA has been watching the 6-ton satellite closely. On Friday officials moved up their prediction for its arrival to Sept. 23, give or take a day.

scientists have calculated the satellite will break into 26 pieces as it gets closer to Earth. The odds of it hitting someone anywhere on the planet are 1 in 3,200. The heaviest piece to hit the ground will be about 350 pounds, but no one has ever been hit by falling in the past.

NASA expects to give the public more detailed information early next week. For now, all except Antarctica could be hit by satellite debris.

Explore further: Computer model shows moon's core surrounded by liquid and it's caused by Earth's gravity

More information: UARS satellite: http://www.nasa.gov/mission-pages/uars/uars-concept.html

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Doschx
5 / 5 (1) Sep 16, 2011
Now would be a great time to test some ground to orbit missile systems, smaller pieces would mean more mass incinerated in re-entry, unless of course there's something in there that NASA doesn't want aerisolized all over the globe.
plasticpower
5 / 5 (1) Sep 16, 2011
Chances are, the explosion would cause a massive amount of smaller pieces to take up residence in higher orbits, causing more space junk for years.
hush1
not rated yet Sep 17, 2011
lol Wonderful comments.
Do we have experience?*

*Worst case bad weather scenario launches.

So silly of me to ask this of space junk:
Please wait! We will have launch weather in 24 hours! Promise!