Health fears over CO2 storage are unfounded, study shows

Sep 12, 2011

Capturing CO2 from power stations and storing it deep underground carries no significant threat to human health, despite recently voiced fears that it might, a study has shown.

Researchers found that the risk of death from poisoning as a result of exposure to CO2 leaks from underground rocks is about one in 100 million – far less than the chances of winning the lottery jackpot.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh studied historical data on deaths from CO2 poisoning in Italy and Sicily, where the seeps naturally from the ground because of volcanic activity.

They found that the number of recorded deaths was very low and say that engineered gas storage underground could be even safer, as it will be planned and monitored.

The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Recent CCS projects in northern Europe and Canada have been criticised by residents over health concerns arising from potential leakage.

Carbon capture and storage enables collection of CO2 before it can escape into the atmosphere. The technology involves the collection of CO2 at a power station or industrial site. The gas is liquefied and piped to the storage site, where it is injected deep below ground. The gas is stored in microscopic pores and eventually dissolves in underground water. Storage sites will have several barriers between the store and the surface.

Storing CO2 gas underground prevents it from contributing to global warming. Such technologies will play an important role over the next 50 years, as a bridge to the development of clean energy.

Jennifer Roberts from the University of Edinburgh's School of GeoSciences, who undertook the work, said: "These Italian CO2 seeps are natural, are often neither sign-posted nor fenced off, and yet there have been remarkably few accidents."

Professor Stuart Haszeldine of the University of Edinburgh's School of GeoSciences, who led the study, said: "Our findings show that storing underground is safe and should allay any concerns that the technology poses a significant threat to health."

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Provided by University of Edinburgh

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omatumr
1 / 5 (1) Sep 13, 2011
There is no reason to store CO2, gaseous plant food!

That idea is the illegitimate offspring from the forty (40) year gestation period of a Chinese Dragon fertilized in Peking on 9-11 July 1971:

www.gwu.edu/~nsar...h-40.pdf

The pregnancy was hidden more than thirty (>30) years before being cited as footnote #4 in declassified documents on President Nixons trip to China on 21-28 Feb 1972:

www.gwu.edu/~nsar...ndex.htm

President Nixon gave the first public hint in announcing on 5 Jan 1972 plans to dismantle the Apollo space program:

http://claudelafl...ams.html

Nixon met USSR leaders on 22-29 May 1972 but gossip at the Lunar Science Conference on 10-13 Jan 1972 that world leaders would sign a world peace treaty in space while orbiting Earth never materialized.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo