Da Vinci sketch recreated on melting Arctic ice

Sep 07, 2011
The crew of the Greenpeace icebreaker Arctic Sunrise helps artist John Quigley recreate Leonardo da Vinci's sketch 'The Vitruvian Man', from copper on the Arctic sea ice. The project aims to draw attention to the ice melt, Greenpeace said.

An artist has recreated Leonardo da Vinci's most famous sketch "Vitruvian Man" in the Arctic ice to draw attention to the ice melt, Greenpeace said Wednesday.

The Arctic ice cap has shrunk to almost the same level as in 2007 when it was at a record low.

An artist specialised in aerial art, John Quigley, travelled to the region on board a Greenpeace ice breaker and reproduced da Vinci's most famous drawing -- depicting a man in two superimposed positions with his arms and legs apart -- some 800 kilometers (500 miles) from the North Pole.

The artwork, which Quigley entitled "Melting Vitruvian Man", measures the equivalent of four Olympic-size swimming pools. The man's two arms and one leg have been cut off, symbolically melting into the sea to illustrate the disappearing ice.

Quigley used copper strips normally used to create solar panels to recreate the 500 year-old drawing.

"Literally is eating into the body of our civilisation," the artist explained in a video clip published by Greenpeace.

The ice cap has never been as small as it was in August with the exception of 2007, according to the US-based National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC) which began its in 1979.

Several forecasts suggest the Arctic ice cap could disappear entirely during the summer months within a few decades.

While that is bad news for environmentalists, the phenomenon could be a boon for oil companies who hope to be able to gain access to oil and gas deposits that are unexploitable under the ice, and to shipping companies which could see shorter with access to the .

Explore further: Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

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that_guy
1 / 5 (1) Sep 07, 2011
While that is bad news for environmentalists, the phenomenon could be a boon for oil companies who hope to be able to gain access to oil and gas deposits that are unexploitable under the ice


The more the ice melts, the more they can drill, the more they drill, the more fossil fuels can be burned. The more fossil fuels are burned, the more the ice melts. Repeat.

Greenpeace is not pleased with this situation
omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Sep 07, 2011
A. The more the ice melts, the more they can drill, the more they drill, the more fossil fuels can be burned. The more fossil fuels are burned, the more the ice melts. Repeat.

B. Greenpeace is not pleased with this situation


A. Nice circular story, but pure fiction [1-3].

B. Who cares? Greenpeace lost all credibility.

1. "Super-fluidity in the solar interior: Implications for solar eruptions and climate",
Journal of Fusion Energy 21, 193-198 (2002)

http://arxiv.org/.../0501441

2. "Earth's heat source - the Sun", Energy & Environment 20, 131-144 (2009)

http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.0704

3. "Neutron repulsion", The APEIRON Journal, in press (2011)

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo
that_guy
5 / 5 (3) Sep 08, 2011

A. Nice circular story, but pure fiction [1-3].

B. Who cares? Greenpeace lost all credibility.

1. "Super-fluidity in the solar interior: Implications for solar eruptions and climate",
Journal of Fusion Energy 21, 193-198 (2002)

http://arxiv.org/.../0501441

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo

Do you ever shut up? Why don't you leave us alone and go apologize to your kids.