BGI develops RNA-Seq (Quantification) from as low as 100 Ng total RNA

Sep 20, 2011

Beijing Genomics Institute reported that they have achieved optimization RNA-Seq (Quantification) library construction with total RNA inputs as low as 100 ng. This breakthrough enables the application of RNA-Seq (Quantification) technology to experimental designs utilizing samples derived from small numbers of cells, such as those widely used in pharmaceutical research, cancer research, and immunology.

RNA-Seq (Quantification), a version of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), is used for transcriptome quantification and analyzing the of certain biological objects in specific conditions. It can be widely applied in biomarker detection, basic medical research, drug discovery, among others. Compared with microarray technology, high-throughput RNA sequencing can provide comprehensive assessment of RNA expression profiles with the advantages of high-throughput data, low background, and repeatability.

However, some tissues or cultures from specialized cells involved in clinical and make it difficult to obtain sufficient RNA for RNA-Seq (Quantification), which previously required 1 μg or more total RNA. BGI has optimized the procedures to enable RNA-Seq (Quantification) using as little as 100 ng total RNA sample input to generate high-quality data. "The improvement of RNA-Seq (Quantification) not only can simplify sample preparation, but also make this sequencing service more cost-effective and with rapid turnaround time," said Jiong Zhang, Technical Specialist at BGI.

To ensure the accuracy and quality of data, many evaluations have been conducted at BGI, including the reads quality, assessments of reads randomness, gene coverage, experimental reproducibility, and data accuracy. Results demonstrated that the data generated from 100 ng sample input library was as high-quality as that from traditional 1 μg RNA input library. "I hope our enhanced technique can contribute more to and therapeutic application in the future," added Zhang.

Explore further: Scientists tap trees' evolutionary databanks to discover environment adaptation strategies

More information: www.bgisequence.com/

Provided by Beijing Genomics Institute

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New technique used to profile anthrax genome

Mar 20, 2009

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have used a new approach, known as RNA-Seq, to profile the gene expression of the bacterium that causes anthrax, Bacillus anthracis. Their study, published ...

Human cells can copy not only DNA, but also RNA

Aug 10, 2010

Single-molecule sequencing technology has detected and quantified novel small RNAs in human cells that represent entirely new classes of the gene-translating molecules, confirming a long-held but unproven hypothesis that ...

Drug kills prostate tumor cells

Aug 11, 2006

U.S. scientists have developed an experimental RNA-based drug -- the first of its kind -- that kills prostate cancer cells, without harming normal cells.

Mayo oral cancer study shows full tumor genome

Feb 23, 2010

Mayo Clinic researchers along with collaborators from Life Technologies are reporting on the application of a new approach for sequencing RNA to study cancer tumors. Their findings from a proof-of-principle study on oral ...

Recommended for you

How a white rot tackles freshly-cut food

Dec 23, 2014

Researchers sequenced and analyzed the white rot fungus Phlebiopsis gigantea, which can break down fresh-cut conifer sapwood. They also sequenced and analyzed the set of P. gigantea's secreted proteins (secretome) ...

Bacteria could be rich source for making terpenes

Dec 23, 2014

If you've ever enjoyed the scent of a pine forest or sniffed a freshly cut basil leaf, then you're familiar with terpenes. The compounds are responsible for the essential oils of plants and the resins of ...

The origin of the language of life

Dec 19, 2014

The genetic code is the universal language of life. It describes how information is encoded in the genetic material and is the same for all organisms from simple bacteria to animals to humans. However, the ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.