Researchers discover unconventional properties in quantum mechanical particle

Aug 17, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- An international team of researchers studying the quantum mechanical particles has discovered some unusual properties that could aid the construction of quantum computers.

Physics PHD student Lauri Lehman, Macquarie University in a joint project with researchers from the University of Leeds and Microsoft Research were considering what happens when one particle - called an 'anyon' - is put into motion. After analysiing their results, they found that anyons move relatively slowly and behave more like a classical particle moving around randomly.

Anyons are essential components in the development of quantum computers and were previously thought to behave like conventional quantum mechanical , which characteristically move very fast.

“This is a surprising result because you would expect anyons to behave like quantum mechanical particles. These are very unconventional properties for this type of particle,” said Mr Lehman.

The complex principles of quantum mechanics mean that the full implications of this research are still not fully understood. The properties of anyons are a subject of intensive research as physicists continue to explore quantum mechanics.

“This research is extremely interesting because it may provide the key to doing quantum computation in a way that is particularly well protected from the disturbances of the environment,” said Mr Lehman.

Researchers hope that this will help in the development of a quantum computer with capabilities far beyond even the most advanced modern supercomputers. It could also help physicists unravel some of the biggest mysteries of the workings of the universe by providing a way to possibly test .

Explore further: Physicists discuss quantum pigeonhole principle

Provided by Macquarie University

4.4 /5 (13 votes)

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rawa1
5 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2011
Anyons are considered a hybrids of bosons (which can never remain still) and the fermions (which are lazy due their inertia and they do prefer not to move at all). So I don't see so surprising, when anyons are moving slowly - they just cannot remain at place. After all, here you can read about "stationary anyons" from the same researchers.
http://www.resear.../mq:9499
The real life examples of anyons are various solitons, tornadoes and vortex rings.
http://www.youtub...5ib5meX4
The quantum vortices in boson condensates are anyons too. They're constrained to thin layers of superfluid like real tornados in atmosphere, but their energy levels remain quantized like at the case of real quantum particles. So they prefer to move in tiny jumps. They often form a Cooper pairs.
http://www.youtub...=related
Due their nature they're moving slowly, but they cannot stop completely, or they would disintegrate.
Techno1
1.4 / 5 (10) Aug 17, 2011
Due their nature they're moving slowly, but they cannot stop completely, or they would disintegrate.


Right, and we just "happen" to be in a universe where they don't disintegrate.

Has someone invented a "Drake equation" for the universe itself?

I mean come on, one more variable that has to be EXACTLY right or the whole universe, at least the "ordinary matter" would fall apart.

Probability of random origins: Zero...
rawa1
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 17, 2011
I mean come on, one more variable that has to be EXACTLY right or the whole universe, at least the "ordinary matter" would fall apart.
This controversial attitude is similar to stance of shark, which has no swim bladder, so he can "speculate": If the density of marine water would differ just infinitesimally from the density of his own body, I couldn't live in it at all? So our shark can "deduce" easily, the whole ocean adjusted it's parameters just for his easy life...

Actually the whole coincidence is given with the fact, the shark managed to evolve in the depth of oceans for long time, so he was not forced to use swim bladder for its vertical motion.

As a aetherist do prefer the "Boltzmann brain" model, in which the intelligent life evolved with motion of some part of matter at place inside of random Universe. Such probability is indeed low - but the Universe is pretty large too. It has lotta places for evolution of sharks...
rawa1
1 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2011
For formally thinking people only the surface of observable matter exist, the vacuum or interior of elementary particles is simply an empty "space-time". But I do perceive the vacuum as a "space" between density fluctuations of gas. This "space" is still full of gas molecules, their collisions are just too temporal and subtle to create some observable structures. Nevertheless, these collisions still count in derivation of probability of accidental life formation.

If we would consider this incredible number of hidden collisions, then the random formation of complex structures would become undeniable instead. It's just the matter of the volume area chosen, if we find some complex creatures in it. As a general clue for their finding can serve the fact, the complexity never comes alone: it's always surrounded with gradient of lower complexity. So we can expect the existence of living creatures inside of every planetary system, which is similar to our solar system and it's stable enough.
prophet36
5 / 5 (2) Aug 17, 2011
Probability of random origins: Zero...


No, not zero, just very unlikely. You might find the Anthropic Principle of interest.
Pyle
5 / 5 (4) Aug 17, 2011
Anyons are considered a hybrids of bosons ... and the fermions

More Zephyr nonsense. If anybody besides "he who speaks to himself" can make any sense of his ramblings, do tell.

Anyons are a type of quantum particle constrained to two dimensions. Here is a dated article cited as a reference on Wikipedia: http://archive.sc...zek1.htm

In addition to using anyons in semiconductors and super conductors, anyons are used extensively in holographics.

Two dimensional = layers. You can peel back the layers, but string theory tell us, if you cut into an anyon it makes you cry...
Noumenon
4.8 / 5 (45) Aug 17, 2011
LOL

The real life examples of anyons are various solitons, tornadoes and vortex rings


Hmm, makes a good sandwhich too.
racchole
3 / 5 (4) Aug 17, 2011
You idiots who are posting realize this is an article about quantum mechanics/computers and not about Carl Sagan pseudo-science and fish stories.
kochevnik
not rated yet Aug 17, 2011
Yet another promising scientific discussion hijacked by a christ psychotic.
ECOnservative
3 / 5 (1) Aug 17, 2011
Anthropic principle exists apart from religion, BTW. For those believing in the multiverse theory (any of them), the coincidences in our particular one are staggering.
kochevnik
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
Anthropic principle exists apart from religion, BTW. For those believing in the multiverse theory (any of them), the coincidences in our particular one are staggering.

When you drop a pack of smokes, the position where it lands is statistically impossible, because the probability of it landing in that exact spot from the infinite number of possible filthy sidewalk positions is zero. In fact you haven't proven god, but the central limit theory of calculus.

If you understood the Anthropic principle you would know that this phenomenon is a necessity because living observers wouldn't be able to exist, and hence, observe the Universe, were these laws and constants not constituted in this exact way. However it is not amazing but trivial, for other universes simply lack the life to ponder existential issues. Rawa1 already covered this ground. Reading skills, please.

In the multiverse theory you exist in a continuum of bifurcated universes. Hence you are ubiquitous, not unique.
rawa1
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
Anyons are a type of quantum particle constrained to two dimensions..
Not always.

http://physics.ap...les/v3/7
You can peel back the layers, but string theory tell us, if you cut into an anyon it makes you cry...
It's original, but it could be understood even without string theory. After all, if string theory can be applied to quantum vortices, why physicists are searching so desperately for strings and their extra-dimensions? They've them already before their eyes...

If these vortices aren't strings, then the string theory has nothing to say about them. It's just a matter of conceptual thinking.
Pyle
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
Anyons are a type of quantum particle constrained to two dimensions..

Not always.

link...
Great article and underlying paper. I guess your "hybrid" comment was kind of relevant. Still useful to know that anyons are "traditionally" 2-D, but that somebody has theoretically worked out a way to get fermions to mimic the behavior is cool.

Dumb joke
It's original, but it could be understood even without string theory. After all, if string theory can be applied to quantum vortices, why physicists are searching so desperately for strings and their extra-dimensions? They've them already before their eyes...
Um... I think this is the talking to yourself stuff I was talking about. To help, I wasn't making a valid point, but instead taking any-on to an-yon to onion and trying to be humorous. I know puns, especially homophones, are often lost on non-native speakers.

Too bad I can't give a 5 to the first half of you comment and a ? to the second half.
Ethelred
5 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2011
a ? to the second half.


Now that would be cool. A Question Mark Rank. I would get a lot of those considering the way I leave words out.

Nearly left out 'lot of'.

Ethelred