Ban turtle eggs trade in Malaysia: WWF

August 3, 2011
Turtles once arrived in their thousands to lay eggs on Malaysian beaches but are now increasingly rare
A handler holds up a green sea turtle at the Turtle and Marine Ecosystem Centre in Rantau Abang in eastern Terengganu state, 2007. Conservationists urged Malaysia to impose a national ban on the trade and consumption of turtle eggs to ensure the survival of the marine creatures.

Conservationists Wednesday urged Malaysia to impose a national ban on the trade and consumption of turtle eggs to ensure the survival of the marine creatures.

Turtles once arrived in their thousands to lay eggs on Malaysian beaches but are now increasingly rare due to poaching and coastal development.

"WWF-Malaysia continues its call for a comprehensive ban on the consumption and trade of turtle eggs of all marine turtle species to ensure the survival of these majestic creatures," Environmental group WWF-Malaysia said in statement.

With no national ban on eating turtle eggs, they are sold openly in eastern Terengganu state where only the sale of leatherback turtle eggs is not permitted, the group said.

are are also available elsewhere in the country.

WWF said contrary to popular belief most people consider the eggs a "delicacy" and eat them for pleasure, not as a source of protein or for their reputed medicinal or aphrodisiac effects.

Explore further: Sea turtles make comeback on Texas coast

Related Stories

Rare prehistoric pregnant turtle found in Utah

May 8, 2009

(AP) -- Paleontologists say a 75-million-year-old turtle fossil uncovered in southern Utah has a clutch of eggs inside, making it the first prehistoric pregnant turtle found in the United States.

Green turtles return to Malaysia but future bleak

August 5, 2010

Green turtles are returning to Malaysia in their hundreds after being nearly wiped out, but experts warned Thursday that the species is still headed for oblivion if habitat loss is not stopped.

Rare leatherback turtle spotted in Indonesia

February 17, 2011

(AP) -- Conservationists say they got a rare glimpse of a 6-foot (2-meter) -long leatherback - the world's most endangered sea turtle - together with dozens of eggs in western Indonesia.

Recommended for you

Researchers design first artificial ribosome

July 29, 2015

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins ...

Studies reveal details of error correction in cell division

July 29, 2015

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and ...

Researchers discover new type of mycovirus

July 29, 2015

Researchers, led by Dr Robert Coutts, Leverhulme Research Fellow from the School of Life and Medical Sciences at the University of Hertfordshire, and Dr Ioly Kotta-Loizou, Research Associate at Imperial College, have discovered ...

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals

July 29, 2015

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that, despite not having a nervous system, plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

that_guy
not rated yet Aug 03, 2011
at first I thought that was an ablino. but apparently green sea turtles are usually white or brown ironically enough.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.