Taiwan unveils eco-friendly rewritable 'paper'

Aug 08, 2011
A group of Taiwan scientists have developed rewritable e-paper that works without electricity, similar to e-books
A group of Taiwan scientists have developed an environmentally friendly form of rewritable electronic paper that works without electricity, similar to e-books like the ones shown but that does not need to be back-lit.

A group of Taiwan scientists have developed an environmentally friendly form of rewritable electronic paper that works without electricity.

Unlike the e-book technology now available on the market, the rewritable e-paper called "i2R e-paper" does not need to be back lit and therefore does not consume , according to the island's top industrial research unit Industrial Technology Research Institute.

"It only requires heat to store or transmit images onto the flexible display," said Frank Hsiu, a senior official at the Institute's Centre based in the northern Hsinchu city.

He said writing on the paper can be erased by inserting it into a thermal writing device similar to what is used in fax machines.

The technology can be used in products such as , electronic bulletin boards and large-sized digital bulletin boards, the institute said.

"At the moment, research results at the laboratory showed that you can write on such paper for up to 260 times," Hsiu said.

"You can imagine how much paper and how many trees can be saved if this product is widely used in the world."

The institute has transferred the technology to a Taiwan company, and expects the product to hit the market in a year or two.

Explore further: Student develops filter for clean water around the world

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Taiwan firms display e-readers at computer show

Jun 01, 2010

(AP) -- Taiwanese electronics firms displayed a slew of e-readers at an industry show Tuesday, with one maker unveiling a lightweight model that can display a full magazine page in color.

US tech giant Qualcomm to build new Taiwan plant

Jan 04, 2011

US technology giant Qualcomm plans to spend one billion US dollars to build a plant in Taiwan to produce new, energy-efficient displays used in tablet devices and e-books, an official said Tuesday.

E-Paper Technology Has New Possibilities in Japan

Jan 27, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- On January 23, 2009 e-paper testing was started in Japan around Toshima Ward Office, which is just east of JR Ikebukuro Station. A wireless network was set up at the Toshima Life and Industry ...

Taiwan pushes e-books but lacks Chinese content

Jan 28, 2010

(AP) -- Taiwan leads the world in development of readers for the fast-growing electronic book market, but when it comes to satisfying the e-appetites of the island's highly literate population, it seems distinctly ...

Recommended for you

Student develops filter for clean water around the world

20 hours ago

Roughly 780 million people around the world have no access to clean drinking water. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 3.4 million people die from water-related diseases every year. ETH student Jeremy Nussbaumer ...

Minimising drag to maximise results

Jul 23, 2014

One of the most exciting parts of the Tour de France for spectators is the tactical vying for spots in the breakaway group at the front of the pack.

User comments : 10

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Techno1
5 / 5 (1) Aug 08, 2011
How is this better than basic digital projectors like we all used in college and normal business presentations?

200-something uses vs infinite uses...

Unless this "paper" is literally as cheap as dirt, it wouldn't be worth it compared to conventional media...
Guy_Underbridge
5 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2011
Behold! The new 'Etch-A-Sketch'
Jimbaloid
5 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2011
1) Current e-Book technology doesn't need to be backlit, nor does it use power unless the image is changed. This 'paper' needs electricity to change the image too, possibly more, for the thermal printer. But this is not a new eBook display anyhow!

2) I just watched a Reuters video about this, and noted that the 'paper' seems to lacks image contrast and was not printable at the edges. I guess they intend to target specific applications only.

3) How 'eco' is it? - Not every sheet is going to be used 200 times in the real world - chances are much will be thrown away early regardless of the fact it could be used again. How many times must it be used before it has a net positive effect over normal recycled paper? Does it decompose if discarded? Can it be recycled when 200 uses are done? What about all the new thermal printers to be manufactured and then sitting around in offices, in standby mode, alongside their traditional paper counterparts?!
krundoloss
not rated yet Aug 08, 2011
I think the best application for this would be a reusable notebook. Sheets of paper would get lost, thrown away, etc. But a reusable notebook, that would be valued more. A student could use the same notebook for multiple years. What would really work is to allow the contents to be uploaded by the notebook. In the end, though, everyone will be using tablet PC's and this will be an afterthought. Nice to see technology advancing!
Manitou
5 / 5 (1) Aug 08, 2011
A small portable chalkboard is cheap and reusable as long as you buy more chalk. It can be erased without a thermal machine.
There are also pen-writable surfaces that can easily be wiped clean.
This e-paper would only be interesting if it could be used for data entry. That doesn't seem to be the case.
Isaacsname
5 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2011
I am pleasently underwhelmed by this tech. Doesn't need electricity , only heat ?.....ok..and the source of this heat is...?
poof
1 / 5 (2) Aug 08, 2011
I am pleasently underwhelmed by this tech. Doesn't need electricity , only heat ?.....ok..and the source of this heat is...?


Your vagina?
Isaacsname
5 / 5 (1) Aug 08, 2011
I am pleasently underwhelmed by this tech. Doesn't need electricity , only heat ?.....ok..and the source of this heat is...?


Your vagina?

Well normally I'd say yes, but it's currently unplugged and in a box under the couch.

So....noe
Jimbaloid
not rated yet Aug 09, 2011
I think the best application for this would be a reusable notebook...


A small portable chalkboard...


Something between the two already exists for sale; Google for 'Boogie Board Writing Tablet'.
Ethelred
not rated yet Aug 15, 2011
Even by Physorg's loosest standards this article is utter crap. Almost completely lacking in any statements that even remotely fit reality. I know Phyorg didn't write but surely someone read it before posting it. HOW THE HELL DID IT GET POSTED?

Hsiu said.
That is one of the few things that might be accurate. Someone said. Oh I suppose the device can be erased by heat. But EVERY claim about the use of electricity was false.

How the hell were there FOUR votes that this was a good article? The first sentence is a lie and then it goes downhill.

similar to e-books like the ones shown but that does not need to be back-lit.
Was the ebook backlit. NO.

Do they need backlit. Not the version shown.

IDIOCY.

Ethelred