Nuts go furthest with the early bird

Aug 17, 2011 By Roel Neijts

Toucans in the tropics disperse nutmegs the furthest in the morning, according to research by Wageningen UR ecologist Patrick Jansen.

Imagine that you are a wild nutmeg tree in South America and you want to give your descendents a good start in life. What would you do? The best method would be to discharge the nuts in the morning and make sure that they travel for about an hour in the crop of a hungry toucan. The nuts will then have the best chances of ending up as far away from the mother tree as possible.

Wild nutmeg trees in South America depend mainly on toucans for . These birds are crazy about these fruits. Not for the nut itself, but for its outer pulp, called mace. That bright red casing is full of fats and proteins. After peeling away the casing, the bird regurgitates the seed.

A lot has already been known about this way of seed dispersal. However, one thing remains unsuccessful: to determine how far toucans disperse these seeds. Tracking birds in a thick forest is practically impossible. Until now. Jansen (Center for Ecosystem Studies) and colleagues followed the daily movements of toucans in Panama by hanging on them backpacks with equipment. A maps the location and an indicates clearly when the bird is eating.

Subsequently in Artis, a zoo in Amsterdam, it was determined how long it takes before a toucan regurgitates a processed seed. When these details are matched, the dispersal chances of seeds can be calculated. It has been estimated that seeds are dispersed an average of 144 metres from the mother tree. One out of five seeds travels 200 metres and some even make it to a kilometre. By the way, toucans fly the furthest in the morning.

Explore further: Next-door leopards: First GPS-collar study reveals how leopards live with people

Provided by Wageningen University

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Overfished Amazon fish disperse seeds long distances

Apr 19, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The gamitana fish, a close relative of the flesh-eating piranha, mostly eats fruit and can carry seeds down the Amazon River as far as 3 miles (5 kilometers), reports a new Cornell study, ...

Recommended for you

Seychelles poachers go nutty for erotic shaped seed

7 hours ago

Under cover of darkness in the steamy jungles of the Seychelles thieves creep out to harvest the sizeable and valuable nuts of the famous coco de mer palm, and their activities are threatening its long-term ...

Laser scanning accurately 'weighs' trees

Nov 21, 2014

A terrestrial laser scanning technique that allows the structure of vegetation to be 3D-mapped to the millimetre is more accurate in determining the biomass of trees and carbon stocks in forests than current ...

Cameras detect 'extinct' wallabies near Broome

Nov 21, 2014

Yawuru Country Managers have found a spectacled hare wallaby (Lagorchestes conspicillatus) population, a species which for the last decade was feared to be locally extinct at Roebuck Plains, adjacent to Broome.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.