Water mist puts out fires at low pressure

Aug 23, 2011
With Sinorix H2O Jet, the Siemens Building Technologies Division launches a highly efficient extinguishing solution, which controls or extinguishes open fires reliably with water mist.

With a new water mist system, fires can be extinguished even from a distance of eight meters. Sinorix H2O Jet is meant for industrial environments, including turbines, painting lines, or production equipment. Special nozzles generate a fine mist of tiny water droplets. The water and the propellant nitrogen are non-hazardous, environmentally friendly, and leave no residues. Sinorix H2O Jet won the Innovation Award in the Fire Fighting category at the Expoprotection trade fair in Paris.

The prerequisites for a fire are oxygen, heat, and fuel. If just one of these factors is eliminated, the fire goes out. Depending on the application, automated fire suppression systems use a variety of agents: water, , or a combination of gas and water. Water cools down the flammable material and environment and thereby prevents the fire from spreading rapidly. And water mist systems have several advantages over sprinklers and foam or gaseous fire-extinguishing systems: The that sprinklers cause to expensive furnishings or equipment is avoided, and no salt residues or surfactants from foam extinguishing agents are left behind. In the past, however, the water mist has been generated by means of high pressure, which makes the installation relatively expensive. That’s why Siemens Building Technologies has developed a two-phase technology that uses low pressure. 

Sinorix H2O Jet was specially developed for the protection of physical assets and their environment. The two-phase technology uses a mixture of water and to generate a maximum cooling effect — at a pressure of less than 16 bar with water droplets of 150 to 200 micrometers in diameter. And the smaller the water droplet size, the larger the surface area for heat absorption and for smothering a fire. When planning a Sinorix H2O Jet system, the Siemens experts calculate the ideal droplet size for the property or equipment to be protected. The system works with two different types of . One is for protection of the objects; it is a patented nozzle that operates according to the Laval principle and can be used to target and extinguish from a distance of up to eight meters. The other nozzle protects objects as well as their surroundings and controls the fire.

Explore further: Researchers find security flaws in backscatter X-ray scanners

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Navy Researchers Apply Science to Fire Fighting

Oct 23, 2009

A fire aboard a Navy ship can quickly become a deadly cauldron. The grim reminders of this would be the deadly fires that took place aboard the USS Forrestal in 1967 or the USS Enterprise in 1969.

Can a drop of water cause sunburn or fire?

Jan 11, 2010

To the gardening world it may have always been considered a fact, but science has never proved the widely held belief that watering your garden in the midday sun can lead to burnt plants. Now a study into sunlit water droplets, ...

Recommended for you

For secure software: X-rays instead of passport control

14 hours ago

Trust is good, control is better. This also applies to the security of computer programs. Instead of trusting "identification documents" in the form of certificates, JOANA, the new software analysis tool, examines the source ...

Razor-sharp TV pictures

16 hours ago

The future of movie, sports and concert broadcasting lies in 4K definition, which will bring cinema quality TV viewing into people's homes. 4K Ultra HD has four times as many pixels as today's Full HD. And ...

Michigan team finds security flaws in traffic lights

17 hours ago

What if attackers could manipulate traffic lights so that accidents would happen with mayhem as the result? That is a question many would rather put off for another day but authorities feeling responsible ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

irjsiq
1 / 5 (1) Aug 24, 2011
Low Pressure 'Mist' vs. 'High Pressure Fog'!
'Fog Nozzles' were developed by the Navy: Partly on the awareness that:
"You Put the Fire Out! because You can't swim home!"
FMC manufacured the 'Bean Gun', 'High Pressure Fog', as the 'Mist' absorbs more heat as it is converted to steam, High Pressure Fog, those 'Fog' particles, under-pressure, Eat a Lot of Fire fast!
Low Pressure Mist, aside from reducing 'water damage', requires Far Less water to accomplish the same goal: 'Put the Fire Out!'

Concept for 'A Method of Fire Suppression'!
Insurance Companies 'payouts' would be reduced significantly!

Roy J Stewart,