Alert level lowered on remote Alaska volcano

August 31, 2011

(AP) -- The Alaska Volcano Observatory has lowered the alert level for a remote Aleutian Islands volcano from "watch" to "advisory."

Satellite data over the past two weeks indicates that growth of the Cleveland Volcano lava dome has paused or stopped.

U.S. Geological Survey scientist in charge John Power says the eruption appears to have been predominantly effusive - rather than explosive - and confined to the summit crater. He likened it to an oozing pile of toothpaste.

The alert level was raised in July after satellites detected persistent thermal anomalies. No significant ash emissions were detected.

Cleveland Volcano is 940 miles southwest of Anchorage.

The volcano's most recent significant eruption began in February 2001 and produced three explosive events that produced as high as 39,000 feet.

Explore further: Iceland raises aviation alert due to Katla volcano activity


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