Las Vegas man accused of mass spamming on Facebook

Aug 05, 2011

(AP) -- A federal grand jury has indicted a Las Vegas man on charges he sent more than 27 million spam messages to Facebook users.

Forty-year-old Sanford Wallace, the self-proclaimed "Spam King," turned himself in Thursday to face charges outlined in last month's indictment filed in San Jose, Calif.

Prosecutors say Wallace compromised about 500,000 accounts between November 2008 and March 2009 by sending massive amounts of through the company's servers.

In March 2009, a judge banned Wallace from using the social networking site, but the indictment alleges that he violated that order within a month.

Wallace is charged with six counts of electronic mail fraud, three counts of intentional damage to a protected computer and two counts of criminal contempt. He posted $100,000 bond after a court appearance Thursday.

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User comments : 3

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dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (1) Aug 07, 2011
I hope he gets serious jail time
tarheelchief
not rated yet Aug 07, 2011
The greatest fear of all bookies remains the same.If bettors can crack their codes,they can cancel debts.
Y8Q412VBZP21010
not rated yet Aug 07, 2011
Oh, "Spamford" Wallace ... I haven't heard anything out of him for a while. This is not his first time around the block on troubles with the law.

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