Japan vows to continue nuclear plant exports

Aug 05, 2011
Since the impact of the disaster on Japan's nuclear industry, officials have been slammed for promoting the sector
Photo taken on March 20, 2011 shows TEPCO's stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant in the aftermath of the devastating twin quake-tsunami disasters. Japan said Friday it would continue exporting atomic power plants, despite uncertainty over its own use of them as it continues to grapple with a crisis at the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant.

Japan said Friday it will continue exporting atomic power plants, despite uncertainty over its own use of them as it continues to grapple with a crisis at the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant.

Tokyo actively promoted nuclear plant exports until a massive quake and tsunami on March 11 sent the Fukushima Daiichi facility into meltdown, causing it to leak radiation in the world's worst since the 1985 Chernobyl disaster.

Japan reached an agreement last October to provide two to Vietnam. It also signed a memorandum in December on civil nuclear cooperation with Turkey, preceding a possible deal for Japanese companies to build a nuclear plant by the Black Sea.

In a statement, the Tokyo government said: "In case other countries wish to utilise our country's nuclear power technology, we should provide it by ensuring that its safety is of the highest global standards."

It added that "a number of countries" continued to express an interest in Japan's nuclear power technology.

The statement, approved by Prime Minister Naoto Kan's cabinet, was issued in response to an opposition question on the government's policy on the export of nuclear power plants.

Amid the ongoing , Kan has recently said Japan should reduce its dependence on and prepare for an eventual halt of nuclear power generation.

In late July, the premier said in parliament he had pushed for exports himself but that "thorough discussions should be held on the matter once again."

The statement also called on Japan's parliament to ratify accords on civil nuclear power cooperation with Jordan, Russia, South Korea and Vietnam to avoid spoiling the fruit of diplomatic negotiations and causing damage to bilateral trust.

Explore further: Imec demonstrates organic photovoltaics modules showing excellent optical properties, high efficiencies

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Swiss protest nuclear power

May 23, 2011

About 20,000 people took part in an anti-nuclear demonstration in north Switzerland on Sunday ahead of a government decision on the future of atomic energy in the country.

Japanese PM pledges 10 mn solar-powered homes

May 25, 2011

Japan will have ten million solar-powered homes, Prime Minister Naoto Kan pledged Wednesday, as the country makes a major push in coming years towards renewable energy following its nuclear crisis. ...

Japan's Mitsui in quake-zone solar plan: report

Jul 06, 2011

Japanese trading house Mitsui plans to build large-scale solar power plants with the capacity to supply 30,000 households in the tsunami-hit northeast, a newspaper reported Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Yale engineer to build 'hot' solar cells

11 hours ago

Associate professor of electrical engineering Minjoo Larry Lee has been awarded $2,540,000 to develop dual-junction solar cells that can operate efficiently at extreme temperatures above 750 degrees Fahrenheit. ...

Fracking's environmental impacts scrutinised

12 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Greenhouse gas emissions from the production and use of shale gas would be comparable to conventional natural gas, but the controversial energy source actually faired better than renewables on some environmental ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Claudius
1 / 5 (1) Aug 05, 2011
Res ipsa loquitur.
hush1
not rated yet Aug 06, 2011
dictus.