GOES-13 Satellite watches Emily fizzle, morph and hope for a comeback

August 6, 2011
This visible image of Emily's remnant clouds was taken from the GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 5 at 16:01 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

A new animation from the GOES-13 satellite shows the creating and morphing of what was once Tropical Storm Emily into an elongated area of low pressure over the Caribbean Sea.

The called GOES-13 provides continuous visible and of the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean basin from its position in space. GOES satellites are operated by , and the NASA GOES Project located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and compiled them into a video of Emily's life so far.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from Aug. 3 at 15:15 UTC (11:15 a.m. EDT) to August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola (bottom right) and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

In an animation of GOES-13 , Emily is observed from August 3 through August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba. On August 5, a still image from GOES-13 showed what appears to be the center of the low was just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them.

Emily is now a surface trough or elongated area of low pressure. The National Hurricane Center noted that Emily's remnants contain a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms extending from eastern Cuba northeastward across the southeastern Bahamas.

There's a good chance that Emily can make a comeback and get her act together on the weekend as upper-level winds become more favorable. The National Hurricane Center gives Emily a 60% chance of making that comeback over the weekend.

Explore further: Still a low chance of development for two lows

Related Stories

Still a low chance of development for two lows

July 22, 2009

The two areas of thunderstorms in the Caribbean from yesterday, July 21, are on the move. One area is now moving into out of the Caribbean and into the eastern Atlantic Ocean while the other is now moving over the southeastern ...

NASA watching 2 areas in the Caribbean, 1 is a rainmaker

June 4, 2011

There are two low pressure areas in the Caribbean Sea for future development into tropical cyclones, although the chances are near zero for one, and minimal for the other. The GOES-13 satellite has been following the life ...

NASA sees the low that won't quit: System 94L

June 10, 2011

The northern Caribbean low pressure area known as System 94L is continually monitored by the GOES-13 Satellite, imagery today shows that it has moved north and is raining on eastern Cuba and the Bahamas.

Recommended for you

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

July 28, 2015

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.