GOES-13 Satellite watches Emily fizzle, morph and hope for a comeback

Aug 06, 2011
This visible image of Emily's remnant clouds was taken from the GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 5 at 16:01 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

A new animation from the GOES-13 satellite shows the creating and morphing of what was once Tropical Storm Emily into an elongated area of low pressure over the Caribbean Sea.

The called GOES-13 provides continuous visible and of the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean basin from its position in space. GOES satellites are operated by , and the NASA GOES Project located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and compiled them into a video of Emily's life so far.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from Aug. 3 at 15:15 UTC (11:15 a.m. EDT) to August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola (bottom right) and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

In an animation of GOES-13 , Emily is observed from August 3 through August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba. On August 5, a still image from GOES-13 showed what appears to be the center of the low was just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them.

Emily is now a surface trough or elongated area of low pressure. The National Hurricane Center noted that Emily's remnants contain a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms extending from eastern Cuba northeastward across the southeastern Bahamas.

There's a good chance that Emily can make a comeback and get her act together on the weekend as upper-level winds become more favorable. The National Hurricane Center gives Emily a 60% chance of making that comeback over the weekend.

Explore further: NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees the low that won't quit: System 94L

Jun 10, 2011

The northern Caribbean low pressure area known as System 94L is continually monitored by the GOES-13 Satellite, imagery today shows that it has moved north and is raining on eastern Cuba and the Bahamas.

Still a low chance of development for two lows

Jul 22, 2009

The two areas of thunderstorms in the Caribbean from yesterday, July 21, are on the move. One area is now moving into out of the Caribbean and into the eastern Atlantic Ocean while the other is now moving ...

NASA watching 2 areas in the Caribbean, 1 is a rainmaker

Jun 04, 2011

There are two low pressure areas in the Caribbean Sea for future development into tropical cyclones, although the chances are near zero for one, and minimal for the other. The GOES-13 satellite has been following ...

Recommended for you

NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye

7 hours ago

NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted ...

Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E

12 hours ago

Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West ...

NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton

15 hours ago

The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton—microscopic aquatic plants ...

Glaciers in the grand canyon of Mars?

16 hours ago

For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. Using satellite images, ...

NASA support key to glacier mapping efforts

16 hours ago

Thanks in part to support from NASA and the National Science Foundation, scientists have produced the first-ever detailed maps of bedrock beneath glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica. This new data will help ...

User comments : 0