Friendship, timing key differences between US, Eastern European love

August 17, 2011

The importance of friendship in romantic love and the time it takes to perceive falling in love are two key differences in how residents in the US, Lithuania and Russia see romantic love, according to a study recently published in Cross-Cultural Research, a SAGE journal.

The study examined how men and women defined romantic love through the use of surveys and used the results to find some commonalities and among the countries. Researchers found that residents of all three countries listed "being together" as their top requirement of romantic love. From there, the notion of romantic love seemed to diverge with the US respondents having different views than Lithuanian and Russian counterparts.

"The idea that was temporary and inconsequential was frequently cited by Lithuanian and Russian informants," wrote authors Victor C. de Munck, Andrey Korotayev, Janina de Munck and Darya Khaltourina. "but not by U.S. informants. Furthermore, we noted that expressions of 'comfort /love' and 'friendship' were frequently cited by the U.S. informants and seldom to never by our Eastern European informants."

Additionally, the data looked at how long it took before respondents fell in love. Americans took longer than their Eastern European counterparts with more than 58 percent saying it look two months to a year. On the contrary, more than 90 percent of Lithuanians report falling in love within a month.

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More information: Find out more by reading the article, "Cross-Cultural Analysis of Models of Romantic Love Among U.S. Residents, Russians, and Lithuanians," in Cross-Cultural Research. The article is available free for a limited time at: ccr.sagepub.com/content/45/2/128.full.pdf+html

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A_Paradox
not rated yet Aug 17, 2011
There is so little _meat_ in this short article that it is almost a complete waste of time. Apart from the fact that it points the user to the original paper and the fact that the original paper is accessible for free, this short article offers nothing else of substance.
COCO
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
as I am only half Lugen I only take 45 days to fall in love

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