Embryo development obeys the laws of hydrodynamics

Aug 18, 2011
Embryo development obeys the laws of hydrodynamics
Credit: Vincent Fleury

Vincent Fleury, a researcher at the Paris Diderot University, studied the early stage of development when embryonic cells first form a flat sheet of cells before folding into a U-shape, resembling a folded pancake. He demonstrated that the formation of a chicken's head is a consequence of the collision between both sides of the embryo flowing at constant speed towards each other.

This study captured for the first time on film highly accurate observations of how a chicken embryo evolves during its first two days of development, using time-lapse microscopy. Prior attempts relied on complex imaging techniques that were costly and not as accurate as direct filming. In this study, the embryo was first taken out of its shell, its yolk removed (as it is not needed in the first 48 hours) and it was kept under appropriate temperature conditions.

Previous developmental studies focused on studying each cell individually. In this study, the embryo was considered in its entirety, like a type of plasticine material able to flow like Dali's melting clocks. The study involved measuring the speed of all points of the embryo and its viscoelasticity in vivo. Combining this data with the biological parameters of the embryo (cells' viscosity, thickness and overall size), the author created a model of the growing embryo's movement.

He discovered that the describing magnetic fields could also be used to model fields of vectors representing the hydrodynamic flow of . When the two sides collided, the embryonic cells were subject to forces that can be described as those of two magnets oriented head on, which resulted in the formation of the head.

These findings demonstrate that the head formation does not merely result from a series of discrete events activated by . It also shows that chemical gradients are not the prevailing force responsible for movement of cells in early embryo formation, as had been previously thought.

These studies shed new light on vertebrate development, and could ultimately provide some clues for scientists involved in regenerative medicines.

Similar work on limb development is due to be published in the August issue of the European Physical Journal Applied Physics.

Explore further: New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

More information: V. Fleury (2011). A change in boundary conditions induces a discontinuity of tissue flow in chicken embryos and the formation of the cephalic fold. European Physical Journal E. DOI:10.1140/epje/i2011-11073-0

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R2Bacca
Aug 18, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
hush1
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
"In this study, the embryo was first taken out of its shell, its yolk removed (as it is not needed in the first 48 hours) and it was kept under appropriate temperature conditions."

What medium harbored the removed embryo?

The "prevailing force" is a 'radio broadcast signal'.

That 'signal' looks like this:

http://www.physor...een.html

Now every cell before specializing (the ICM)
is subject to this signal.

The signal repeats many times.

The part of the signal that represents a part of the whole reaches a cell at the point where the part is to be.
So that part of the signal trips the "genetic switch" of the 'undecided'(stem) cell to be that part.

All too simple to be true.
Or just invoke hydrodynamics.
Or rocket science.
A mid-flight hydrodynamic explosion.

It's alright. We're here to pick up the pieces.
Philosophers_Stone_Meyer
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
Its the radio like waves emitting from the Sun and the Planets, like Jupiter and Venus, etc... they know that the planets help form development and electromagnetic pulses and ionic activity, Freemasons funded many studies on the bright morning star on developing brains.
gmurphy
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
Who'd have thunk it?, embryo development governed by the same mathematical models as magnetic vector calculus, reminds me of this xkcd comic: http://xkcd.com/435/
hush1
not rated yet Aug 18, 2011
lol. Good that this reminded you of that.
Math rules - the best slave of Nature ever.

Spot expected. Instead of 'radio broadcast signal', biochemical ionic gradient flux field of potential over potential S3-sphere surface cell manifolds just has more sexy, sciency appeal. lol

Freemasions? lol
http://science.ho...ason.htm

"George Washington was one. So were Benjamin Franklin, Paul Revere and Henry Ford. All of these illustrious and influential men were Freemasons (or Masons) -- privileged members of the worlds oldest and largest fraternity."

Some day when I'm old enough, I will join a fraternity too.
Isn't the brightest star in the sky really Venus?
What became of the studies and brains?
dxion329
not rated yet Aug 21, 2011
Whether due to radio waves, magnetic fields, or then bylaws of the Free Mason Society, this proclivity of the embryonic cells is fascinating. I wonder, though, whether it is species specific?
hush1
not rated yet Aug 21, 2011
DNA is not species specific. The proclivity of DNA is not species specific.