Dutch politicians question LinkedIn advertising

Aug 13, 2011

(AP) -- Social networking site LinkedIn says it will alter an advertising technique, following criticism and questions in the Netherlands about whether it violated privacy laws.

LinkedIn has been testing "social ads" since June. Some attach users' photos to ads for services they have shown an interest in, then broadcast them to other members of their networks.

Dutch lawmaker Jeroen Recourt asked the justice minister this week to investigate whether it is legal in the Netherlands.

The company said on its website Friday that reaction from users was "loud and clear" and it will stop using user photos in ads.

The Dutch are the heaviest users of per capita, though there are more United States users in absolute terms.

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