US forecasters see busy rest of hurricane season

Aug 04, 2011

(AP) -- U.S. government forecasters say the rest of the Atlantic hurricane season is likely to be busy, with an above-average number of storms.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters said Thursday they expect up to 19 named storms to develop by the end of the season Nov. 30. There have been five so far.

Seven to 10 of the forecast storms could become hurricanes.

The six-month began June 1, but the peak period for hurricanes runs from August through October.

The lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center in Washington says key climate factors support forecasters' expectations. Those factors include exceptionally warm ocean temperatures and the possible redevelopment of La Nina, a weather phenomenon that reduces wind shear over the Caribbean Sea and tropical Atlantic.

Explore further: Submarine data used to investigate turbulence beneath Arctic ice

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Busy Atlantic storm season predicted

Aug 02, 2005

U.S. storm forecasters say they expect 11 to 14 tropical storms with most developing into hurricanes over the remainder of the 2005 Atlantic storm season.

El Nino may calm 2006 hurricane season

Sep 07, 2006

Hurricane forecasters say a weather phenomenon called El Nino may make the rest of the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season quieter than predicted.

Recommended for you

Antarctica's retreating ice may re-shape Earth

Feb 27, 2015

(AP)—From the ground in this extreme northern part of Antarctica, spectacularly white and blinding ice seems to extend forever. What can't be seen is the battle raging underfoot to re-shape Earth.

The sun has more impact on the climate in cool periods

Feb 27, 2015

The activity of the Sun is an important factor in the complex interaction that controls our climate. New research now shows that the impact of the Sun is not constant over time, but has greater significance ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.