Asia's giants exposed to natural disasters - survey

Aug 11, 2011
A firefighter uses a rope to rescue a group of 36 Chinese villagers stranded on a section of road destroyed by a mudslide in China's Sichuan province in July 2011. The United States and Japan have the highest bills to pay from natural disasters, but Asia's emerging giants -- China, India and Indonesia -- are proportionately at greater risk from them, a survey said on Thursday.

The United States and Japan have the highest bills to pay from natural disasters, but Asia's emerging giants -- China, India and Indonesia -- are proportionately at greater risk from them, a survey said on Thursday.

British risk assessors Maplecroft ranked 196 countries according to their economic exposure to earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, landslides, floods, storms and wildfires.

Four nations -- the United States, ranked first, followed by Japan, China and Taiwan -- were deemed at "extreme risk" in absolute terms, which means the overall cost in dollar terms from a natural disaster.

Seven other countries (Mexico, India, the Philippines, Turkey, Indonesia, Italy and Canada) were rated as "high risk" in absolute terms.

But a different picture emerged when countries were assessed for their social and economic ability to cope with a disaster.

China, India, the Philippines and Indonesia were all in the high risk category, while the United States and Japan were rated low risk.

Seventeen countries, most of them African and headed by Somalia, were considered to be at extreme risk, according to the barometer of socio-economic resilience.

The survey, the Risk Atlas 2011, looks at 11 indicators derived from data for 2005-2010 compiled by the (IMF), World Bank and the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

It does not include the effects of drought on national economies or the cost to agriculture from natural disaster.

"Natural hazards have been more costly to the so far than any other year on record," Maplecroft observed.

"The tsunami in Japan, tornadoes in the , the Christchurch earthquake (in New Zealand) and flooding in Australia have all contributed to a massive $265 billion total for the first six months of the year."

Explore further: Boosting global corn yields depends on improving nutrient balance

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

UN sketches countries with climate risk profile

Jun 11, 2009

Disasters caused by climate change will inflict the highest losses in poor countries with weak governments that have dashed for growth and failed to shield populations which settle in exposed areas, a UN report ...

Mapping the Risks of Hurricane Disasters

Sep 26, 2005

The Natural Disaster Hotspots report released earlier this year showed that the U.S. Gulf Coast is among the world's most at-risk regions in terms of human mortality and economic loss due to storms like Katrina ...

India's 'digital divide' worst among peers: study

Mar 30, 2011

Most Indians are missing out on the "digital revolution" due to dismal Internet access for the poor with the nation lagging far behind its emerging market peers, a study found Wednesday.

Japan quake makes 2011 costliest disaster year

Jul 12, 2011

Japan's earthquake in March is set to make 2011 the costliest year to date for natural disasters, reinsurer Munich Re said on Tuesday, although the number of deaths globally is relatively low so far.

China joins space data disaster charter

May 24, 2007

China has become a member of the Space and Major Disasters Charter that provides satellite data to nations during natural or human origin disasters.

More Than Half World Population Exposed to Natural Hazards

Apr 01, 2005

The World Bank has published a report entitled, "Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis," that presents a global view of disaster risks associated with some major natural hazards—drought, floods, cyclones, earthquakes, ...

Recommended for you

Global change: Trees continue to grow at a faster rate

10 minutes ago

Trees have been growing significantly faster since the 1960s. The typical development phases of trees and stands have barely changed, but they have accelerated—by as much as 70 percent. This was the outcome ...

Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber

14 minutes ago

New research has found that the Great Barrier Reef is a remarkably effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than ...

Cape Cod saltmarsh recovery looks good, falls short

27 minutes ago

After decades of decline, grasses have returned to some once-denuded patches of Cape Cod's saltmarshes. To the eye, the marsh in those places seems healthy again, but a new study makes clear that a key service ...

Manure offsets fertiliser's nano-scale changes

30 minutes ago

A UWA study has shown how long-term use of chemical fertilisers changes the soil on a nanoparticle scale and how these changes can be avoided by adding organic matter such as manure.

Red tide off northwest Florida could hit economy

4 hours ago

It's like Florida's version of The Blob. Slow moving glops of toxic algae in the northeast Gulf of Mexico are killing sea turtles, sharks and fish, and threatening the waters and beaches that fuel the region's ...

User comments : 0