Amazon deforestation on the rise again in Brazil

Aug 03, 2011
Graphic showing monthly deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, based on satellite analysis by the National Institute for Space Research. More than 300 square kilometers of rainforest was destroyed in June.

Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon accelerated in June, with more than 300 square kilometers destroyed, a 17 percent increase over the previous month, government researchers said Tuesday.

The National Institute for Space Research (INPE) said 312.6 square kilometers (120 square miles) were destroyed in June, based on the preliminary analysis of satellite photos of the vast South American rainforest.

May had seen a decrease in deforestation to 268 square kilometers (100 square miles) from 477 square kilometers (180 square miles) in April.

In April, more than 400 square kilometers (150 square miles) of forests were destroyed in a single state, Mato Grosso, which is seen as a major agricultural frontier and is used for cattle ranches and soybean farming.

At the 2009 UN in Copenhagen, Brazil committed itself to reducing Amazon deforestation by 80 percent by 2020.

Brazil, the world's fifth largest country by area, has 5.3 million square kilometers of jungle and forests -- mostly in the basin -- of which only 1.7 million are under state protection.

The rest is in private hands, or its ownership is undefined.

Massive deforestation has made Brazil one of the world's top emitters, and the pace of deforestation peaked in 2004 at 27,000 square kilometers (10,000 square miles) a year.

By 2010, however, it had dropped to 6,500 square kilometers, thanks in part to the INPE's Real-Time Detection System (DETER), which allows researchers to collect new on a daily basis.

However, the system can only monitor areas of 25 hectares (60 acres) or more, so its results are not considered definitive.

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User comments : 12

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88HUX88
1 / 5 (1) Aug 03, 2011
shouldn't that be decrease in the RATE of deforestation per month?
Moebius
3.9 / 5 (7) Aug 03, 2011
The destruction of the amazon rainforest is more of a threat to us than 100 Bin Ladens or Talibans. The US has wasted 100's of billions of dollars to avenge an attack that killed a couple thousand people and yet actions that threaten us all go without any reaction. Everyone on this planet needs the rainforests. Their destruction, in not only the amazon, is more of an act of war than we have seen since the last time US military action was actually justified, Pearl Harbor. Like most things though, we won't miss it till it's gone and then it will be too late.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Aug 03, 2011
THe US benefits from it Moebius. WHere do you think most of our ethanol comes from?
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Aug 03, 2011
The US has wasted 100's of billions of dollars to avenge an attack that killed a couple thousand people and yet actions that threaten us all go without any reaction.

So? Do you honestly still think the US (government) cares about its citizens? They are, to the last man and woman, multi-millionaires. (This goes for most other nations' governments as well). You don't get to be a millionaire by caring about others.

War is something they can profit from individually (by way of making the taxpayers cough up the cash and then taking their share).
So is going deeper into debt (who do you think is going to pay for it and who do you think is actually seeing any of that money taken out as loans? Right. )

There's no money in protecting the citizens of the US (much less the world) so it won't happen.
ziprar2
1 / 5 (1) Aug 03, 2011
Brazil committed itself to reducing Amazon deforestation by 80 percent by 2020


There will be nothing to reduce by 2020
Sean_W
3 / 5 (2) Aug 03, 2011
Some of the formerly cleared land has been left to revert back to jungle. So is the amount of deforestation given *net* or just new? I suspect reforestation is being ignored.
emsquared
1 / 5 (3) Aug 03, 2011
The destruction of the amazon rainforest is more of a threat to us than 100 Bin Ladens or Talibans.

There will be nothing to reduce by 2020

You freaking ideologues. Do either/any of you donate money or time to causes that try and prevent deforestation? No? How about causes that aid in dragging the populations of those countries out of poverty so they don't have to deforest? Didn't think so.

Your feigned concern and impotence are both equally pathetic and disgusting. DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT IF IT'S SUCH A BIG DEAL TO YOU!!

Or just continue to gnash your teeth and whimper on the internet like the impotent blow-hards you are.
Y8Q412VBZP21010
5 / 5 (1) Aug 03, 2011
THe US benefits from it Moebius. WHere do you think most of our ethanol comes from?


US corn farmers. Brazilian ethanol is much cheaper -- it's much easier to reduce sugar cane to enthanol than corn to ethanol because there's no need to break down starch. However, at least at last notice American import duties were pricing Brazilian ethanol out of our market.
Moebius
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 03, 2011
The destruction of the amazon rainforest is more of a threat to us than 100 Bin Ladens or Talibans.

There will be nothing to reduce by 2020

You freaking ideologues. Do either/any of you donate money or time to causes that try and prevent deforestation? No? How about causes that aid in dragging the populations of those countries out of poverty so they don't have to deforest? Didn't think so.

Your feigned concern and impotence are both equally pathetic and disgusting. DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT IF IT'S SUCH A BIG DEAL TO YOU!!

Or just continue to gnash your teeth and whimper on the internet like the impotent blow-hards you are.


LOL You actually think Brazil will leave a vast portion of their land undeveloped some way besides at gunpoint? And you call me an ideologue.

The rightful owners of that forest are its indigenous population. They have no money, no guns and no lawyers so no one sticks up for them. Only a government can stop the rainforest destruction.
emsquared
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 04, 2011
LOL You actually think Brazil will leave a vast portion of their land undeveloped some way besides at gunpoint?
...
Only a government can stop the rainforest destruction.

So, you mean military action? Or perhaps eco-vigilantes?

Why do I get the feeling that if we dug around enough we could find you complaining about America's wars? Or would this somehow be a justifiable war since, you know, we'd be protecting the interest of everyone on earth?
Y8Q412VBZP21010
not rated yet Aug 04, 2011
A comment from a few weeks back in ETHANOL PRODUCER magazine:

"After years of protesting the 54-cent per gallon ethanol import tariff imposed by the U.S. government, it appears Brazilian producers may soon get the equal market opportunity theyve been yearning for. Whether the tariff is allowed to expire as scheduled at the end of the year or it is removed earlier by legislation, support to uphold the tariff is waning and it is unlikely that a 54-cent tariff will be in place this time next year."
Moebius
2 / 5 (4) Aug 04, 2011
Yes, I am against all the wars we have had since world war 2. I can't think of a single incident that warranted the US attacking another country. The worst thing was 9/11 and that only killed a few thousand people. So in retaliation we sacrifce a few more thousand american lives and kill many thousands of other people. Are we safer now? We're certainly much poorer.

Yes, I think the destruction of the worlds rainforests is worth stopping at almost any price including military action.

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