Video: Festo's Smartbird robot featured at TED conference

July 26, 2011 weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Robotics company, Festo, showed off the near four-month old creation, Smartbird robot, at the 2011 TEDGlobal Conference in Edinburgh.

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Markus Fischer, a Smartbird project leader, unveiled live demonstrations along with a brief talk about the robotic seagull.

With the help of an on board motor, Smartbird, modeled after the herring gull, can flap its wings and fly.

From a company whose inventions also include a pair of robotic penguins and an elephant’s trunk, Festo’s Smartbird really soars.

Explore further: How hummingbirds fight the wind: Robotic device helps analyze hovering birds

More information: www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-bird-plane-robot-video.html

via IEEE

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