Typhoon Ma-on's eye seen in NASA satellite Images

Jul 15, 2011
Typhoon Ma-on's eye seen in NASA satellite Images
This image of Typhoon Ma-on from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite clearly shows the storm's eye, although it has some high clouds in it. The image was taken at 04:15 UTC (12:15 a.m. EDT) on July 15 as Typhoon Ma-on continues moving west in the western Pacific Ocean. Credit: Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team, Jeff Schmaltz

The eye of a tropical cyclone is an indication of a strong storm, and Typhoon Ma-on's eye was apparent in visible and infrared imagery captured by NASA's Aqua satellite. Ma-on just achieved Category Four status on the Saffir-Simpson scale that measures hurricane intensity.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took an image of Typhoon Ma-on that clearly shows the storm's eye, although it has some in it. The image was taken at 04:15 UTC (12:15 a.m. EDT) on July 15 as Typhoon Ma-on continues moving west in the western Pacific Ocean.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Ma-on on July 14 at 03:23 UTC, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an of the storm. The infrared image showed a large area of coldest and the strongest thunderstorms mostly south of the center of circulation, and also revealed an eye at that time.

On July 15 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Ma-on's winds were stronger than they were the day before. are now at 115 knots (132 mph/213 kmh). Ma-on is located about 250 nautical miles south of Iwo To, Japan near 20.7 North and 140.9 East.

The strongest thunderstorms in Ma-on are still located south of the center of circulation. Visible, microwave and all show a well-defined eye within the storm.

Ma-on is moving to the west-northwest along the southern edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure. This weekend people on Iwo To, Chici Jima and Kadena Air Base can experience rough seas and gusty winds and rains.

Ma-on is then expected to move to the north, then northeast as it curves around the western edge of the ridge. That would put Ma-on on track to skirt the eastern edge of the big island of Japan early next week.

Explore further: Researchers prove for the first time that ash clouds can cross Atlantic Ocean

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA eyes Typhoon Fanapi approaching Taiwan

Sep 17, 2010

Infrared satellite data from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed strong convection and a tight circulation center within Typhoon Fanapi as it heads for a landfall in Taiwan this weekend.

Recommended for you

Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

8 hours ago

A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.