Russia launches US satellites in third attempt

Jul 13, 2011
A Soyuz TMA-01M rises at the Russian-leased Kazakh Baikonur cosmodrome ahead of a launch. A Russian Soyuz rocket successfully carried six US Globalstar satellites into orbit after postponing the launch twice earlier this week, Russia's space agency said.

A Russian Soyuz rocket successfully carried six US Globalstar satellites into orbit on Wednesday after postponing the launch twice earlier this week, Russia's space agency said.

The rocket blasted off from Russia's Baikonur cosmodrome it leases from neighbouring Kazakhstan at 0227 GMT, said in a statement.

The launch of the Globalstar-2 satellites for the eponymous US-based company, a provider of mobile satellite voice and data services, had been initially scheduled for Monday.

It was then postponed twice for technical reasons, the space agency said.

Russia in April fired the head of its space agency after a series of humiliating mishaps cast a shadow over its space programme.

In December, the country suffered one of its most embarrassing space failures in recent times when three for the new Glonass system, Russia's answer to GPS, crashed into the ocean off Hawaii instead of reaching orbit.

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omatumr
1 / 5 (1) Jul 13, 2011
A Russian Soyuz rocket successfully carried six US Globalstar satellites into orbit"


Thanks, Obama and predecessors for all your efforts to protect the sovereignty of the USA, . . . if any funds remained after spending all our resources policing the world and battling the imaginary threat of CO2-induced global warming.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo