After the revolution: Groups vie for minds, votes of Egyptians

Jul 20, 2011

Despite helping to push Hosni Mubarak and his regime from power, Egypt's liberals and pro-democracy activists are having trouble moving from revolution to politics, according to a recent article in the World Policy Journal.

In this in-depth look at the Egyptian political landscape, the article's author, Jenna Krasjeki, examines various groups vying for influence and public support in the run-up to elections this fall. One common characteristic that Krasjeski notes is the lack of organization in the groups of young, liberal who helped serve as catalysts to the protests in Tahrir Square.

"Was it possible that they had enough power to topple Mubarak, but not enough to avoid being pushed aside in the new Egypt?" Krasjeki writes. "Secular-democrats and are scrambling to organize. The result has been an amorphous array of organizations and parties, each trying to define a platform and identify leaders to sell it to the Egyptian public."

One challenge the youth activists face is the need to expand their grassroots support beyond the educated middle class in Cairo. While many of them were successful while concentrating their activities in Cairo and using social media, such as , to help spur street demonstrations, those tools are proving less effective in wide swaths of rural Egypt, where access to the Internet is limited. In the meantime, other groups, such as the Muslim Brotherhood and the remnants of Mubarak's National Democratic Party, are using their political experience and organizational abilities to sway Egyptian voters.

Explore further: Do you always get what you pay for? How consumers mispredict product quality

More information: Krasjeki also reports on the current military government's uncertain commitment to democratic reform in the article, "Beyond Tahrir Square," in World Policy Journal. The article is available free for a limited time at: wpj.sagepub.com/content/28/2/89.full.pdf+html

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

International alliance to unlock secrets of Egyptian mummies

May 18, 2005

Two world-renowned teams of experts on Egyptian mummies have joined forces in an international effort to better understand disease and its treatment in ancient Egypt. The University of Manchester's Centre for Biomedical Egy ...

Internet giants criticize Egypt blockade

Feb 02, 2011

Google, Facebook and Twitter, breaking with the usual practice of corporate silence, are speaking out forcefully against the Internet blockade by the Egyptian authorities.

Nonviolence key to successful revolution: ND Expert

Feb 08, 2011

The social change fervor sweeping through Egypt and the Middle East is one of the most dramatic expressions of "people power" in history, says David Cortright, director of policy studies at the University of Notre Dame’s ...

Vodafone: Egypt forced us to send text messages

Feb 03, 2011

(AP) -- Egyptian authorities forced Vodafone to broadcast government-scripted text messages during the protests that have rocked the country, the U.K.-based mobile company said Thursday.

Hackers train sights on Yemen after Egypt

Feb 03, 2011

The loose-knit group of online global hackers known as "Anonymous" has trained its sights on Yemen following cyber attacks on government websites in Tunisia and Egypt.

Recommended for you

Study examines use of GIS in policing

33 minutes ago

Police agencies are using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for mapping crime, identifying crime "hot spots," assigning officers, and profiling offenders, but little research has been done about the effectiveness of the ...

When rulers can't understand the ruled

17 hours ago

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America's unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them.

When casualties increased, war coverage became more negative

21 hours ago

As the number of U.S. casualties rose in Afghanistan, reporters filed more stories about the conflict and those articles grew increasingly negative about both the war effort and the military, according to a Penn State researcher. ...

User comments : 0