Plutonium tricks cells by 'pretending' to be iron

Jul 11, 2011 By Jared Sagoff
Researchers learned that, to get into cells, plutonium uses iron as a "trojan horse."

(PhysOrg.com) -- Plutonium gets taken up by our cells much as iron does, even though there's far less of it to go around.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern University have identified a new biological pathway by which finds its way into . The researchers learned that, to get into cells, plutonium acts like a "," duping a special membrane protein that is typically responsible for taking up iron.

This discovery may help enhance the safety of workers who deal with plutonium, as well as show the way to new "bio-inspired" approaches for separating from other metals in used .

Because the bodies of have evolved no natural ability to recognize plutonium—the element was first produced in 1941—scientists were curious to know the cellular mechanisms responsible for its retention in the body. The researchers exposed adrenal cells from rats to minute quantities of plutonium to see how the cells accumulated the radioactive material.

Using the high-energy X-rays provided by Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, the researchers were able to characterize a particular protein known as "transferrin," which is responsible for bringing iron into cells. Each transferrin is made up of two subunits, known as N and C, that normally bind iron. When another protein—the transferrin receptor—recognizes both the N and C subunits, it admits the molecule to the cell. However, when both the N and C subunits contain plutonium, the transferrin receptor doesn't recognize the protein and keeps it out.

Contrary to their expectations, the researchers discovered that in one of the mixed states—when an iron-containing N-subunit is combined with a plutonium-containing C-subunit—the resulting hybrid so closely resembles the normal iron protein that the uptake pathway is "tricked" into allowing plutonium to enter the cell.

"Although the interaction between plutonium and bodily tissues has been studied for a long time, this is the first conclusive identification of a specific pathway that allows for the introduction of plutonium into cells," said Mark Jensen, an Argonne chemist who led the research.

The results of the study were published online on the website of Nature Chemical Biology on June 26. The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science as well as by the National Institutes of Health.

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LuckyExplorer
not rated yet Jul 12, 2011
"Plutonium tricks cells by 'pretending' to be iron"
Stupid title:
Never heard before that Plutonium is intelligent...

Why should the body protect itself from an artificial element? - It simply cannot do that.

Besides that it is nice to know the mechanism, because it could help to protect people.

Otherwise it would be better to stop producing Plutonium, this scrap

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