Physicists excited by hints of Higgs boson existence

Jul 26, 2011

Birmingham particle physicists are today trawling through the data from particle collisions at the Large Hadron Collider that could indicate the existence of the Higgs boson

Against the regular backdrop of results from known processes, proton-proton collisions have produced considerable fluctuations that have intrigued scientists working at the ATLAS project in CERN. 

The discovery of the could fill in a vital missing link in the ‘standard model’ which is the accepted theory of particle physics - it will tell scientists why everything in the universe has mass.

As a result of smashing high energy protons together about 100 trillion times the physicists have now been able to rule out the Higgs boson particle over an extensive mass range, in particular at large masses, where no previous studies have been possible.  This has given them a better, more precise clue as to where this elusive particle might be found.

Professor Paul Newman, particle physicist from the University of Birmingham and member of the ATLAS collaboration said: ‘We have a very successful theory that describes all of the known elementary particles and the forces that act between them. However, it doesn’t give the particles any mass, so we need to add one more ingredient to this theory which is where the Higgs boson comes in. 

‘No one has seen it and no one knows how heavy it is, so that is why we have been searching in such a wide mass range for it.  The new results have narrowed down this mass range quite considerably.  However the biggest excitement is for masses around 130 - 150 gigaelectron volts (about 150 times heavier than a proton) where we are seeing more events than would be expected from background sources alone.  We need more data before we can say for sure that this is the Higgs boson rather than a fluke.  For now we can only say that if there is a at around this mass, it would give this sort of signal.’

Birmingham physicists are part of a 3000 strong team of scientists from all over the world who have been working on the ATLAS experiment at the .  Birmingham has made a significant contribution to this project by designing and building some of the sophisticated trigger electronics that are selecting the important in the detector.  The collisions that are chosen by these triggers help scientists to concentrate on the data most likely to yield new discoveries.

Another experiment at the LHC, the CMS detector, has also seen similar results, which corroborate the findings at ATLAS.  Professor Dave Charlton, Birmingham physicist and deputy spokesperson for the international ATLAS collaboration, said: ‘The fact that both experiments see similar results makes it even more intriguing. We have some way to go and a lot more data to collect before we can confidently say if we have found the Higgs – or if it doesn’t exist.  But by the end of 2012 we expect to have the answer.  In the meantime this is some of the most exciting news to come from the LHC experiments.’

Explore further: How the physics of champagne bubbles may help address the world's future energy needs

Provided by University of Birmingham

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anadish
1.1 / 5 (18) Jul 26, 2011
No collision 'on earth' can bring out Higgs. I literally mean 'on earth', because these are not the condition which can take us back to the so-called big bang. Further, Higgs is theory. In practice gravity is due to particles which have been overlooked by the SM, because it does not acknowledge the STR much. My site gives a chronology of the developments in my research efforts; don't be too much disappointed by the absence of details or by an absence of neatly painted instruments (and then, the site really is quite like a blog), the details shall be published independently with the publication of my US patent application by the US Patent Office. Although, I feel, even then there would be so much more to explore after our world view change.
jjoensuu
5 / 5 (2) Jul 26, 2011
You might get out Higgs if you smash together two classical physics books at very high speed;-)
J-n
5 / 5 (3) Jul 26, 2011
In practice gravity is due to particles which have been overlooked by the SM, because it does not acknowledge the STR much. My site gives a chronology of the developments in my research efforts;


Cool, I didn't see a link, would you mind explaining the high points here? Would be nice to see what your ideas are! Where do you do your research?

don't be too much disappointed by the absence of details or by an absence of neatly painted instruments


The instruments being painted.. I doubt anyone really cares.. but.. Details man.. Details.. THATS where the science is, no?
hard2grep
5 / 5 (1) Jul 26, 2011
i am not sure i understand how the higgs boson can weigh that much more than a proton; it is responsible for mass? someone please explain... would this mean that the first few elements are massless?
hard2grep
3.5 / 5 (2) Jul 26, 2011
nevermind... yhis is shure complicated spin-vector-molasses stuff.
Kayleb
not rated yet Jul 26, 2011
i am not sure i understand how the higgs boson can weigh that much more than a proton; it is responsible for mass? someone please explain... would this mean that the first few elements are massless?

It is theorized to give mass. Why would the first few elements be massless?
DarkHorse66
1 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2011
I'm not sure (and please correct if this is not what he means), but I think hard2grep is comparing the relationship between different particle sizes and and the amount of mass that normally comes with a given size. The argument appears to be that if the Higgs is bigger than a proton (and is massless), then there would be (volume wise) more Higgs than particle present, in those first,lightest, simplest elements. Thus possibly the quantity of Higgs overwelming the mass-effect of meeting the few other particles present.
But personally, I don't see this as a likely scenario, especially if creating mass is more to do with the Higgs field being generated by these particles. Then it wouldn't matter how many 'regular' particles would be interacting with the field, they don't weaken/strengthen/change it by doing so. They simply move through it as they go.
Callippo
1 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2011
i am not sure i understand how the higgs boson can weigh that much more than a proton; it is responsible for mass?
I don't understand, why Higgs is responsible for mass of Z/W bosons only. What gives the mass to electrons, for example?
rawa1
1 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2011
Before some time I proposed, the Higgs boson searched is actually top-quark pair, revealed before many years at Tevatron, because I realized, the same dilepton decay channel has been used for both top quark detection, both Higgs boson detection at LHC.. Now the new study proposes, a top quark bound by to its anti-matter partner, the antitop, would act as a version of the elusive Higgs boson, conferring mass on other particles.

http://www.nature...436.html

By the way, the article mistakenly attributes the top quark condensation idea to Christopher Hill. The idea came from Nambu, Jona-Lasino 1961, Nambu 1988, Miransky et al 1989, Tanabashi and Yamawaki.

Despite ot this, I don't really think, the Higgs is just a bound state of top quarks. I'm just saying, the same artifact, which is searched at LHC was revealed at Fermilab before many years.
rawa1
1 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2011
If you check the graph of estimated Higgs boson mass spectrum, you will see, the excluded regions are separated into two gaps: one wide and narrow one at ~ 83 GeV.

http://upload.wik...2011.png

If you check the top quark mass (172.0±2.2 GeV/c2), you'll realize, it's exactly the twice of the value of the gap. It's another indicia, the Higgs particle is hidding right there.

http://en.wikiped...op_quark
ant_oacute_nio354
1 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2011
The mass is the electric dipole moment.
JimB135
5 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2011
Details man.. Details.. THATS where the science is, no?


Nope.... That's where the devil is.
ant_oacute_nio354
1 / 5 (2) Jul 27, 2011
The mass is the electric dipole moment:

m = e.k/x (1-pi^3.alfa^2 /2)

e-electron charge;k-Boltzmann constant;x-Compton wavelength;
pi=3.1415927;alfa-fine structure constant.

alfa = 1/(137^2 pi^2)^.5

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