NASA sees Tropical Storm Nock-ten knocking the Philippines

Jul 27, 2011
This visible image of Tropical Storm 10W, now called Nock-ten, was captured on July 26, 2011 at 02:30 UTC (July 25 at 10:30 p.m. EDT) as its center was moving over the Philippines. The image was taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that flies on NASA's Terra satellite (it also flies on NASA's Aqua satellite). Credit: NASA/MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tropical Storm Nock-ten, formerly tropical depression 10W continues raining on the Philippines, and a NASA satellite image shows the extent of the storm's clouds.

A visible image of 10W, now called Nock-ten was captured on July 26, 2011 at 02:30 UTC or 10:30 a.m. local Asia/Manila time (July 25 at 10:30 p.m. EDT) as its center was moving over the Philippines. The image was taken from the (MODIS) that flies on NASA's (it also flies on NASA's Aqua satellite). The center of circulation in the image appears to be near the Cataduanes Island on the eastern side of the Philippines, in the Philippine Sea.

By 1200 UTC (8 p.m. local Asia/Manila time), surface weather reports from Catanduanes confirmed the low level circulation center passed north of the site. The center of Nock-ten is forecast to cross just north of Manila later today, July 26 and early July 27.

At 12:00 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) on July 26, Nock-ten's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kmh) making it a minimum tropical storm. It was located about 110 nautical miles east of Manila near 14.7 North and 122.6 East. Nock-ten was moving to the west-northwest at 5 knots (6 mph/9 kmh). It is expected to keep moving in that direction because it is following the outside of a ridge (elongated area) of high pressure located north of Luzon (which is north of the storm).

Residents of the central Philippines can expect heavy rainfall, gusty winds and some localized flooding as Nock-ten sweeps across land today and tomorrow. According to the Joint , Nock-ten should weaken as it moves over land, but re-energize once it enters the South China Sea on July 27.

Explore further: Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tropical Storm Conson forms in northwestern Pacific

Jul 12, 2010

Tropical Storm Conson formed in the northwestern Pacific Ocean over the weekend, and is now poised to bring rainfall and gusty winds to the northern Philippines. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Conson on ...

Recommended for you

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

6 hours ago

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

There's something ancient in the icebox

6 hours ago

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Image: Grand Canyon geology lessons on view

13 hours ago

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station, as well as one of the best-known tourist attractions in the world. The steep walls of ...

First radar vision for Copernicus

14 hours ago

Launched on 3 April, ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite has already delivered its first radar images of Earth. They offer a tantalising glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this new mission will provide ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

There's something ancient in the icebox

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...