Lockheed Martin's multi-mission signal processor completes tracking test

Jul 26, 2011

The Lockheed Martin Aegis SPY-1 radar successfully identified, tracked and conducted simulated engagements against live aircraft  in a stressing electronic attack environment during a test of the Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP).

The MMSP is developed and fielded as part of the U.S. Navy’s Aegis system, which combines next-generation Ballistic (BMD) and anti-air warfare capability in an open combat-system architecture. 

During the test, live aircraft conducted simulated attacks at the U.S. Navy’s Vice Admiral James H. Doyle Combat Systems Engineering Development Site. The Aegis SPY-1 , equipped with MMSP, tracked the aircraft and successfully executed all attack scenarios.

“By combining the proven SPY-1 radar and Aegis BMD signal processing into a single open architecture platform, we can provide a cost-effective technical solution with unprecedented future growth to the U.S. Navy," said Brad Hicks, vice president of naval radar programs at ’s Mission Systems & Sensors business. “The success of this test confirms the system is on track for deployment to the fleet next year.”

As part of the Aegis Modernization Program, MMSP is scheduled for installation on guided missile destroyers currently equipped with the Aegis Weapon System, starting in 2012. 

The Aegis BMD element of the nation’s ballistic missile defense system provides the capability to use hit-to-kill technology to intercept and destroy short- and medium-range ballistic missiles. Additionally, Aegis BMD-equipped ships provide surveillance and tracking of intercontinental ballistic missiles and work with other elements of the nation’s missile defense systems to provide advance warning for the defense of the nation, deployed U.S. forces and allies.

The Missile Defense Agency and the Navy are jointly developing Aegis BMD as part of the United States' Defense System. Currently, a total of 25 Aegis BMD-equipped warships - 21 in the U.S. Navy and four in the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force - have the certified capability to engage ballistic missiles and perform long-range surveillance and tracking missions. Twelve additional ships have been identified for modification to perform BMD capabilities by 2014.

Explore further: Our new anti-earthquake technology could protect cities from destruction

More information: www.lockheedmartin.com/products/SPY1FamilyOfRadars/index.html

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