Japan says plant clean-up will take decades

Jul 09, 2011
An aerial view shows the quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in the Japanese town of Futaba, Fukushima prefecture in March 2011. Japan's prime minister said the decommissioning of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant would take decades, in the first government announcement of a long-term timeframe for the clean-up.

Japan's prime minister said on Saturday the decommissioning of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant would take decades, in the first government announcement of a long-term timeframe for the clean-up.

A monster tsunami crippled cooling systems at the Fukushima Daiichi plant following the March 11 earthquake, with three reactors suffering meltdowns, triggering the world's worst in a generation.

"Many people have been forced to evacuate," Naoto Kan said during a meeting of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan.

"It is expected to take three, five, or 10 years for controlling it, and even several decades until the accident settles finally."

The Japan Atomic Energy Commission and Fukushima plant operator Power Co have set a provisional goal of starting the removal of melted nuclear fuel at about 2021, NHK said.

The station reported that the authorities, the operator and equipment manufacturers also expect "several decades" to pass before the reactors are ready to be dismantled, citing a long-term roadmap for bringing the plant under control.

Japan has unveiled a short-term to stabilise the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, which has emitted high levels of radiation after its cooling systems were knocked out.

But the government had not until Saturday presented an estimate of how long it will take before the crisis can be brought to an end.

The blueprint obtained by NHK was mapped out by studying how the United States handled the 1979 Three Mile nuclear accident, the broadcaster said.

TEPCO expects to reduce by July and bring its reactors to a stable cold shutdown by January at the latest.

Goshi Hosono, newly appointed state minister in charge of handling the , has told Jiji Press that the government will announce a revised roadmap and a longer-term vision for the accident on July 19.

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wwqq
not rated yet Jul 09, 2011
No sense rushing it. Waiting a few years before you start dismantling the core makes it cheaper, easier and safer for the workers to clean it up.

The clean-up process consists of slowly and methodically chipping away at the core in various ways; see the clean-up of three-mile island:

http://www.youtub...FB29zVZM
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Jul 09, 2011
"Waiting a few years before you start dismantling the core." - wwqq

Reports are that the core has already been dismantled, and portions of it are deposited on the containment room floor, in the cracks in the walls, in the emergency cooling torus, in the cracks in the walls of that torus, and in the ground water that is leaking into the ocean.

TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Jul 09, 2011
Just imagine the advances in remote handling and robotics, not to mention medical treatment for long term radiation exposure to large populations, that we stand to gain from this. Just the thing for colonizing mars and the moon.

Humans - a crisis-driven species.
Newbeak
not rated yet Jul 10, 2011


Humans - a crisis-driven species.

Exactly.More technological progress has been achieved during war than during any corresponding peacetime period.
wwqq
not rated yet Jul 11, 2011
Reports are that the core has already been dismantled, and portions of it are deposited on the containment room floor, in the cracks in the walls, in the emergency cooling torus, in the cracks in the walls of that torus, and in the ground water that is leaking into the ocean.


Unfortunately the signal to noise level of shrill sensationalist morons to normal people is too high to place much confidence at all in such claims.

Remember when the fuel in #4 spent fuel pool went dry and caught fire?

That was widely reported, widely believed for about 2 months before we saw the first videos from inside #4 fuel pool; with the fuel sitting there all nice and tidy; took radiation readings and found that few if any fuel elements in #4 fuel pool had even been damaged.

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