Impact statement on US oil pipeline due in August

Jul 23, 2011
The US State Department is seen in Washington, DC, 2010. The US State Department said Friday it expects by mid-August to release a final environmental impact statement on a proposed $13 billion oil pipeline that would stretch from Canada to Texas.

The US State Department said Friday it expects by mid-August to release a final environmental impact statement on a proposed $13 billion oil pipeline that would stretch from Canada to Texas.

The 1,700 mile (2,700 kilometer) pipeline proposed by TransCanada, the Keystone XL, would begin in Alberta in western Canada and pass through the US states of Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma before ending up in Texas at the .

A Republican-dominated Congressional committee voted on Wednesday for a resolution urging Secretary of State to "immediately approve" the project, which would guarantee oil access for the US.

But a number of environmental and citizen groups have launched a fight against the pipeline because of the oil's origin: the unconventional oil sands of Alberta require energy that produces a large volume of greenhouse gasses.

After the environmental impact statement is released, federal agencies will have 90 days to conduct a review of the document, with a final decision scheduled for the end of the year.

The State Department will also hold public meetings in each of the six states through which the would pass.

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User comments : 4

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mountain_team_guy
2 / 5 (4) Jul 23, 2011
I just hope the environmental impact assessment asks whether the pipeline is buried under any mountain streambeds. Kinda obvious I would think, but if someone already addressed all the important questions, why would we need the EPA?
Caliban
5 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2011
Well, mountainteamguy,

Why don't you try looking into the sitch? It appears that you are assuming that a Corporate consortium has the best interests of ordinary Americans -not to mention Texans, Canadians, and the environment- as their primary concern, and would just naturally take every conceivable available action to safeguard THOSE interests over their own profit.

Are you really that naive? Just to give you an idea -try a web search for keywords "oil pipeline" and "Yellowstone".

That should -if you aren't already familiar with the Enbridge Spill in Michigan, BP(Deepwater Horizon)'s White Wolf in Alaska, and even TransCanada's very own Keystone rupture in North Dakota -give you an idea of what we may reasonably expect of this proposed "Natural Gas" pipeline, and the level of Corporate "accountability" attached to it.

And, just for kicks, you might read up on the "environmental impact" attending development of Alberta's Tar Sands oil deposits.

Then ask yourself "why the EPA"?
eachus
1 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2011
Two points worth remembering. First, building this pipeline, or not building it, will have no effect on Canadian tar sands mining. It will just determine where the oil goes.

Second, a much better alternative to the pipeline would be to build oil refineries nearer the source of the oil. New refineries in the Midwest would reduce the cost of moving the oil to the Gulf coast, then moving some of the refined oil to Midwestern markets. The new refineries would be much "cleaner" in environmental terms than the existing refineries. Not so much because of EPA rules, but because 50 to 100 years of technology improvements mean that more of the crude can be turned into product, leaving less overall waste of any kind. But the new technology crackers and refining systems have to be built. Somewhere...
Caliban
not rated yet Jul 23, 2011
Two points worth remembering. First, building this pipeline, or not building it, will have no effect on Canadian tar sands mining. It will just determine where the oil goes.

Second, a much better alternative to the pipeline would be to build oil refineries nearer the source of the oil. New refineries in the Midwest [...]The new refineries would be much "cleaner" in environmental terms than the existing refineries. Not so much because of EPA rules, but because 50 to 100 years of technology improvements mean that more of the crude can be turned into product, leaving less overall waste of any kind. But the new technology crackers and refining systems have to be built. Somewhere...


Both very good points, Eachus. But why be efficient, when you can charge to transport the product twice, pay yourself to do it, and use this expense to jack up the price to the end user?
That would cost Big Oil billions in lost profits annually.