GOES-13 satellite movie shows formation of Tropical Storm Don

Jul 28, 2011
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Don from the GOES-13 satellite at 1101 UTC (7:01 a.m. EDT) on July 28 shows a small storm that appears somewhat disorganized, near the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Tropical Storm Don formed at 5 p.m. EDT last night, July 27, in the southern Gulf of Mexico and appears to be a small storm on GOES-13 satellite imagery. NASA compiled two days of GOES-13 imagery in a 30 second movie that shows how and where Don formed.

GOES-13, the , watched on July 27, as the low pressure area called System 90L strengthened quickly into tropical depression number 4, and then tropical storm Don. Data from the NOAA managed GOES-13 satellite was processed at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and made into an animation that showed Don's quick birth.

The 30 second movie of Don's birth in the southern Gulf of Mexico runs from July 26 at 1315 UTC (9:15 a.m. EDT) to July 28 at 1045 UTC (6:45 a.m. EDT). GOES-13 imagery shows Don to be around 100 miles in diameter, and extend 45 miles from Don's center.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

As of July 28, a tropical storm watch is in effect for Texas coast from the mouth of the Rio Grande northward to west of San Luis Pass and those conditions are possible by late Friday.

At 5 a.m. EDT on July 28, Don had near 40 mph (65 kmh). It was located about 495 miles (795 east-southeast) of Brownsville, Texas near 23.0 North and 88.7 West. Don's estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars. Don is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kmh) and is expected to continue on this track through Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center. Don is also expected to speed up.

The Brownsville, Texas office posted the tropical storm watch and forecasts "isolated to scattered showers and some thunderstorms and winds will accompany Don as it eventually makes landfall in south or deep South Texas."

Explore further: NASA balloons begin flying in Antarctica for 2014 campaign

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists make strides in tsunami warning since 2004

Dec 19, 2014

The 2004 tsunami led to greater global cooperation and improved techniques for detecting waves that could reach faraway shores, even though scientists still cannot predict when an earthquake will strike.

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans

Dec 19, 2014

Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.