Facebook offers rewards to security bug hunters

Jul 30, 2011
Facebook said a typical bounty was $500 but it
The logo of social networking website Facebook is displayed on a computer screen in London 2007. Facebook began offering rewards of $500 or more on Friday to security researchers who identify vulnerabilities in the social network.

Facebook began offering rewards of $500 or more on Friday to security researchers who identify vulnerabilities in the social network.

"To show our appreciation for our security researchers, we offer a monetary bounty for certain qualifying security bugs," Facebook said in a blog post.

who are the "first person to responsibly disclose" a bug that could "compromise the integrity or privacy of Facebook user data" would be eligible for a bounty of $500, Facebook said.

"Our security team will assess each bug to determine if qualifies," Facebook said.

The Palo Alto, California-based titan said a typical bounty was $500 but it "may increase the reward for specific bugs."

Facebook last month hired George Hotz, a celebrated hacker known as "GeoHot," but has not disclosed what he is doing for the company.

Hotz was sued by Sony for hacking the Japanese company's game console and is credited with being the first person to go public with a way to hack into an .

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Kedas
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
People can find me on facebook.
Not sure if that is a security bug.
SincerelyTwo
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
$500 is a rip off, are you kidding?! Nobody worth a damn will find exploits to give up for such a low reward, you can make 5x more, and then some, selling the information to the right groups instead, pending how easy the exploit is to take advantage of and its reliability, etc.
SincerelyTwo
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
Kedas, I use different pseudonyms everywhere, never drop my real name or personally identifying info on the internet. The problem is you in the end, people need to learn to take responsibility for themselves. If you don't want specific information about you to be available for people to take advantage of then you simply do not share it, at all, period.

Say for arguments sake your name is 'John Doe' and you don't want people to find you by searching around for 'John Doe'. Well, 1 plus 1 = 2, you do not put the name 'John Doe' anywhere, problem solved. If you tell your friends in real life a profile is you, then they know it's you.
maxcypher
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
ST: You're assuming that "Kedas" is his/her real name.
frajo
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 30, 2011
facebook is a security bug.
Kedas
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
Obviously I do not exist on facebook or any other "lets share everything with everyone and trust it's safe for ever" sites.

frajo said the same what I said.
but people ignore it when you are so direct like frajo.
BillFox
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
Umm... 500 dollars is pocket change, you could sell some exploits for far more and save facebook money they would have spent doing damage control and fixing it.
_nigmatic10
not rated yet Jul 31, 2011
I've identified a vulnerability in Fartbook. It's the "Just say no!" vulnerability that prevents people from signing on to the mindless social network and spending hours playing monkey level games.
poof
not rated yet Jul 31, 2011
Lets see, facebook is valued at 50 billion or something, so they are offering 0.000001% of the value of their company for something they should be paying considerably for.

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