Debris may be on collision course with space lab: NASA

Jul 11, 2011 by Kerry Sheridan
This handout illustration image created by Australia's Electro Optic Systems (EOS) aerospace company shows a view of the Earth with low-orbiting space debris. The US space agency is tracking a piece of space junk that could be on a path toward the International Space Station, where the shuttle Atlantis has just docked on its final mission, NASA said.

NASA is tracking a piece of Soviet space debris that could collide with the International Space Station, the US space agency said Sunday after the shuttle Atlantis docked on its final mission.

The is part of Cosmos 375, a satellite launched in 1970 by the former Soviet Union and which collided with another satellite and broke apart, but details about the size and exact trajectory of the object were unknown, NASA said.

However, the debris could be on a collision course with the station at around 12 noon (1600 GMT) on Tuesday, the same day that two US astronauts are scheduled to step out on a .

"The team expected updated tracking information following todays docking to help determine if a maneuver using the shuttle's thrusters is necessary to avoid the debris," NASA said in a statement.

Word of the debris came shortly after the docked at the orbiting for one last time, on its final before the entire 30-year US shuttle program shuts down for good.

The shuttle docked at 11:07 am (1507 GMT), just over an hour after the spacecraft performed its habitual slow backflip so that the ISS crew could take pictures of Atlantis's before clasping onto the lab, NASA said.

Hatches opened between the two spacecraft at 12:47 pm (1647 GMT), and the four Atlantis astronauts floated across to greet their ISS crewmates with hugs and smiles.

A close call between the orbiting outpost and a piece of happened just two weeks ago, and the astronauts took temporary shelter in their docked at the station until it passed.

are monitoring more than 500,000 pieces of debris in Earth's orbit, NASA said.

"It is not uncommon. There is a lot of junk in orbit and there are a lot of objects that are being tracked," said deputy manager of the LeRoy Cain.

"What we were told today is very preliminary," Cain said. "It is a potential right now."

Atlantis's flight marks the end of an era for NASA, leaving Americans with no actively operating government-run human spaceflight program and no method for sending astronauts to until private industry comes up with a new capsule, likely by 2015 at the earliest.

With the shuttle gone, only Russia's three-seat Soyuz capsules will be capable of carrying astronauts to the ISS at a cost of more than $50 million per seat.

Asked on CNN Sunday about headlines that proclaim the start of a period of Russian dominance in spaceflight, the US space agency's administrator Charles Bolden said: "I don't think I could disagree more with the headlines."

"We have been the leader for many years, many decades now, and that will -- we will maintain that leadership," said the former astronaut.

Atlantis is carrying 8,000 pounds (3,000 kilograms) of supplies, which the combined crew of 10 -- four aboard the shuttle's STS-135 mission and six aboard the ISS as part of Expedition 28 -- will transfer during the mission.

A failed ammonia pump will then be transferred to the shuttle payload bay for return to Earth.

Monday will be occupied with setting up the transfer of the Raffaello multipurpose module, which holds the extra supplies, from the shuttle to the Earth-facing side of the station's Harmony module.

A spacewalk by American ISS crew members Garan and Mike Fossum is set for Tuesday.

The duo has already stepped out together on three spacewalks in June 2008 as part of the STS-124 mission that delivered the Japanese Kibo lab to the ISS.

The shuttle's return to Earth is currently scheduled for July 20, though NASA may add an extra day to the mission.

After that, NASA will continue working with private industry on plans to build a next generation spacecraft to tote astronauts and cargo to the ISS, while NASA focuses on a multipurpose crew vehicle that could take astronauts to deep space, Bolden said.

"The president has set the goals: an asteroid in 2025, Mars in 2030. I can't get any more definitive than that," he said.

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User comments : 5

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stanfrax
1 / 5 (1) Jul 11, 2011
international rescue calling Thunderbird 4 - Atlantis will not fall into sea - thunder bird 3 be ready for launch
Isaacsname
2 / 5 (2) Jul 11, 2011
We should look for signs of intelligent life in the universe by trying to spot garbage clouds orbiting hospitable planets.

Should be a " biomarker " of sorts.

nejc2008
5 / 5 (1) Jul 11, 2011
Well, when NASA lands on an asteroid in 2025 and in 2030 on Mars, we can be certain of finding intelligent life forms there. They will speak mostly Chinese and probably Russian too.

:)n.
Skepticus
not rated yet Jul 12, 2011
Station Commander: "Ready Defense Lasers!!"

Chief Engineer (mumble): "Sir, Congress cancelled funding for their installation. We don't have them. The Russian won't ferry them unless we share with them. They are being used in Afganistan."

Station Commander: "Move this damn thing out of the way, then!"

Chief Engineer (mumble): "We can't, Sir. The Soyzus thrusters can't give enough delta-v in time."

Station Commander: "Then get in that sardine can, and pray!!"
Temple
not rated yet Jul 12, 2011
Atlantis is carrying 8,000 pounds (3,000 kilograms) of supplies


I hate to nitpick, but I think the area of spaceflight deserves extra rigor when it comes to units and unit conversion. Historically these types of errors have shown to be somewhat costly:

http://en.wikiped...ons_loss