Credit card hacker sentenced to 10 years in prison

Jul 23, 2011
In this photo illustration, major US credit cards are seen in New York City 2009. Rogelio Hackett, who stole more than half a million credit card numbers used to rack up nearly $40 million in illicit debt, was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison and fined $100,000.

Rogelio Hackett, who stole more than half a million credit card numbers used to rack up nearly $40 million in illicit debt, was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison and fined $100,000.

Hackett, 25, pleaded guilty in April to trafficking in counterfeit credit cards and aggravated identity theft.

When US Secret Service agents searched his home two years ago, they discovered more than 675,000 stolen .

companies later identified tens of thousands of fraudulent transactions using the numbers and totaling more than $36 million.

Hackett admitted that he had been in stolen credit cards since at least 2002.

"Hacking and identity theft were a way of life for Mr Hackett," US Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said in a statement. "For years, he used the Internet to steal and sell identities to further a multi-million-dollar fraud."

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epsi00
2.7 / 5 (3) Jul 23, 2011
10 years? at 4 million/year. I wish I were a programer. he can retire to an island in the pacific once out of prison. Crime pays.
BrusierTDS
4.5 / 5 (2) Jul 23, 2011
Epsi00: Did you read the article? It never says Hackett charged more than $36 million dollars worth of illegal charges from the cards. The cards that he trafficked (stole and then sold) had illegal changes of more than $36 million dollars.

10 years is a long time for an electronic crime.

First of all I doubt this guy is a "hacker" or a real hacker (ethical hacker) at that. The continued misuse of the word still annoys me. "cracker" should be the term used to describe these script kiddies and malicious people.theft does not equal curiosity.
Mahal_Kita
5 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2011
Ten years in prison in the US is not a vacation.. He will have a real hard time.
hiranyu
5 / 5 (2) Jul 23, 2011
The guy will be out in 5 years for good behavior and be 30 years old.
DiverseByDesign
1 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2011
Epsi00: Did you read the article? It never says Hackett charged more than $36 million dollars worth of illegal charges from the cards. The cards that he trafficked (stole and then sold) had illegal changes of more than $36 million dollars.

Did YOU read the article? HE did not charge 36 million. It say that there were 36 million in charges on the cards, but he didn't do it. He sold the cards to others and they made the charges. His time in prison will NOT be easy. So regardless crime did NOT pay.

And he is NOT a hacker OR a cracker. Script kiddie is better, but he is not either of the other terms either.
89118a
3 / 5 (2) Jul 23, 2011
Aside from the profit, he'll definitely have healthcare. Two studies in the past year have shown black Americans live longer when they have health care, even in prison.

And they can never vote again. The War on Drugs has given the USA innumerable citizens that can no longer vote. Preventing people from voting means their concerns may never be heard or addressed. That's not good for any society.
Noumenon
Jul 24, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
jmlvu
3 / 5 (3) Jul 24, 2011
I think the court should send his name and prison address to all 675,000 people who had their credit cards stolen so they card send him hate mail.
If each person spent one hour fixing their account he wasted 77 man years of their time.