China cracks down on wi-fi in public spaces

Jul 28, 2011
China has the world's largest online population with 485 million users
A man browses the internet in Shanghai, 2010. China has ordered public spaces offering wi-fi web access to install costly software to enable police to identify people using the service

China has ordered public spaces offering wi-fi web access to install costly software to enable police to identify people using the service, state media said Thursday.

The software, which also gives police a list of all websites visited by an online user, costs between 20,000 yuan ($3,100) and 60,000 yuan, the China Business News said.

As a result, many establishments such as bars, restaurants, cafes and bookstores have decided to stop providing to their customers despite its popularity, to avoid paying the money, the report said.

In Beijing, cafe and restaurant owners have been told they face a minimum fine of 5,000 yuan if they continue to offer wireless without installing the software, it said.

"In serious cases," offenders could see their Internet cut off for up to six months, the report said.

Cafe owners in Shanghai and in the eastern city of Hangzhou contacted by the official China Daily newspaper said they had also been notified of the new measure, which other reports have said is being rolled out nationwide.

The software is purportedly designed to supervise "," the report said.

"It's a requirement of the public security organs. Why should we pay the fees?" Yang Xiaowen, manager of UBC Coffee in Beijing, told the China Daily.

"For a reason that everyone is aware of, we are temporarily stopping our wi-fi service," announced the Beijing-based Kubrick bookstore, according to the China Business News.

The report also raised questions about ties between police and the Rainsoft, a company founded in 1998 that reportedly collaborates with public security organs in many Chinese provinces.

China -- which has the world's largest online population with 485 million users -- constantly strives to exert its control over the Internet, blocking content it deems politically sensitive as part of a vast system.

In one high-profile case in 2009, it ordered computer makers to add an software to all new personal computers sold in the country, saying it would shelter children from pornographic and violent web content.

But it was forced to back down on the plan just ahead of the deadline after an outcry in China and abroad.

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User comments : 23

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krundoloss
3.9 / 5 (7) Jul 28, 2011
Oh, China, at what point is stability of your nation more important than the happiness of your citizens? When does it stop? Sure you are productive, but your people are so oppressed. What is the point of life if you have no freedom? This whole "Human Rights" concept seems like such a pain. Why not just clone a few million drones and eliminate humanity entirely? Point being - A great nation can be described not by its accomplishments, but by the quality of life of those within the nation.
FunkyDude
5 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2011
internet = people are empowered > government oversight
Yellowdart
1 / 5 (3) Jul 28, 2011
internet = people are empowered > government oversight


Yeah, but its more like an "intranet" there. You feel empowered, until you get the same government page, every time you type in www.google.com
frajo
3 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2011
Point being - A great nation can be described not by its accomplishments, but by the quality of life of those within the nation.
You're talking about the First Nations?
Telekinetic
2.5 / 5 (8) Jul 28, 2011
When I was growing up, one's right to privacy was immutable, and now it seems most people accept that as a bygone era. What aggravates me most about China's abuse of human rights is that the West, we, are complicit by buying their products which tacitly approves their fascist state. We're also forced to keep our mouths shut because they could sink our economic system overnight should they cash in their stake in our debt. How did we get into this position? We listened to free market mouthpieces who quoted Ricardo and sold our once-glorious manufacturing base to the lowest bidder. We listened to Republican claptrap saying it's the unions bringing us down, so now the American worker has to feel grateful for the crumbs if he can even find work. I'm waiting for the backlash to begin, when America returns to its "maker of goods" legacy, and Americans can participate as more than just consumers.
mathsmyenemy
not rated yet Jul 28, 2011
That's really sad to hear. I always had the hardest time finding decent wifi, even in the bigger cities. There is this one eclectic cafe in Beijing called The Bridge Cafe.. free lemonade, music from the 60s to now, great western menu, open 24 hours with free wifi. That was the coolest place to cool out.. The Chinese are always so fanatical about knowing every last little thing you're doing. And the internet has always been their shining moment of utter repression..
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Jul 29, 2011
Oh, China, at what point is stability of your nation more important than the happiness of your citizens?

You have to understand the asian mindset (most notably the Chinese mindset) where the common 'good' is everything and individual happiness means little. If you keep that in mind then all these strange rulings and repressionist activities make 'sense'. This is an attitude that has prevailed in China for thousands of years.

(Of course it all falls down when you observe how for the ruling class their own individual happiness suddenly beccomes paramount)
krundoloss
2 / 5 (4) Jul 29, 2011
Bunch of black-haired drones.
paulthebassguy
1.6 / 5 (30) Jul 31, 2011
Why not just clone a few million drones and eliminate humanity entirely?


Chinese people are essentially clones! Have you ever been there? They all look the same, think the same, do the same haha.
FrankHerbert
Aug 01, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
FrankHerbert
4.3 / 5 (65) Aug 01, 2011
LMAO Look at this guys! http://www.physor...activity

Paulthebassguy has an account called paulthebassguy2 that he uses to give every single one of his posts a 5. LOL this is so pathetic.
paulthebassguy
1.3 / 5 (61) Aug 01, 2011
Frank, please stay focussed on topic. Don't make this personal. This is supposed to be a comment thread about wifi censorship in China.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Aug 01, 2011
And you just used both your accounts to downvote Frankherbert, and then used you own account to upvote your comment on 'not making this personal'

I have to agree: you're beyond pathetic. If you have to resort to these types of shenannigans then anything you say must be taken with a healthy dose of scepticism.

Oh..and I have reported your account for abuse.
frajo
1.7 / 5 (11) Aug 01, 2011
LMAO Look at this guys! http://www.physor...activity

Paulthebassguy has an account called paulthebassguy2

He has? Or somebody else has?

that he uses

He or somebody else.

to give every single one of his posts a 5. LOL this is so pathetic.


Yes. _This_ is so pathetic.
Created 2011.0801 and published the same day.
frajo
1.7 / 5 (11) Aug 01, 2011
And you just used both your accounts to downvote Frankherbert, and then used you own account to upvote your comment on 'not making this personal'

I have to agree: you're beyond pathetic. If you have to resort to these types of shenannigans then anything you say must be taken with a healthy dose of scepticism.

Oh..and I have reported your account for abuse.


How can you be sure the account "paulthebassguy2" has been created by the owner of account "paulthebassguy"? Anybody could have done it.
frajo
1.7 / 5 (11) Aug 01, 2011
How can you be sure the account "paulthebassguy2" has been created by the owner of account "paulthebassguy"? Anybody could have done it.


Addendum:
But we can be sure that only the owner of account "paulthebassguy" can have rated a comment by user "paulthebassguy2" giving him a score of 5.
As witnessed in the discussion thread following the article "Ravenous wolves colonise France, terrorise shepherds".
People are funny, sometimes.
FrankHerbert
4.3 / 5 (61) Aug 01, 2011
And you just used both your accounts to downvote Frankherbert, and then used you own account to upvote your comment on 'not making this personal'

I have to agree: you're beyond pathetic. If you have to resort to these types of shenannigans then anything you say must be taken with a healthy dose of scepticism.

Oh..and I have reported your account for abuse.


Lol paul is a pretty pathetic guy. This was his response to me in this topic over PM:


haha you're just jealous because you didn't have such a good idea!

It's not racist if it's true! Just like saying "women are bad drivers" is not sexist because that's also true, as we know.


I know I can't prove it here, but the moderators of this site should be able to look into my account and see I'm not making this up and therefore this is an admission to his other account. The "I'm not a racist because here's an incredibly sexist remark" non-sequitur is also pretty disgusting and in character for this troglodyte.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Aug 01, 2011
How can you be sure the account "paulthebassguy2" has been created by the owner of account "paulthebassguy"?

Because he admitted doing so in another comment thread.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (9) Aug 01, 2011
You have to understand the asian mindset (most notably the Chinese mindset) where the common 'good' is everything and individual happiness means little.

That's the 'progressive' mindset as well.
Did anyone forget China is still a communist state and tolerates capitalism to keep from becoming like North Korea?
paulthebassguy
1.4 / 5 (27) Aug 01, 2011
Frank, again, please stay on topic and stop being so aggressive. If you disagree with someone on a comment thread that's fine, but be respectful and don't put them down please.

I'm not the only one you put down. I've seen you troll other articles and make personal attacks against others who disagree with you. You are the bully of Physorg.
FrankHerbert
4.4 / 5 (62) Aug 01, 2011
Chinese people are essentially clones! Have you ever been there? They all look the same, think the same, do the same haha.


This is your standard for being "on topic"?
paulthebassguy
1.4 / 5 (27) Aug 01, 2011
Well, Frank, yes, it was a reference to the fact that Chinese people are oppressed and have little opportunity for individualism. This is not a racist comment, it's refering to their culture - that they are obliged to act for their society as a whole instead for individual benefits.

The "clones" comment was in response to what krundoloss's first comment mentioned.

It's a shame that you jumped to the conclusion I was being racist instead of actually looking further into the point I was trying to make. It seems like you are trying to create conflict in these comments.
dtxx
not rated yet Aug 01, 2011
I'd really like to know how the tracking mechanism works. MAC based? Chances are it can easily be defeated. My guess is that soon this software will go the way of Green Dam Youth Escort.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Aug 02, 2011
They all look the same, think the same, do the same

It seems you have neither been to china nor met any chinese people privately.