Boeing, Embraer back sugar jet-fuel study

Jul 26, 2011
Participants look at a 100% ethanol powered aircraft made by Brazilian jet manufacturer Embraer in 2008. Embraer and US rival Boeing said Tuesday they will co-finance research to determine the sustainability of using Brazilian sugarcane in jet fuel.

Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer and US rival Boeing said Tuesday they will co-finance research to determine the sustainability of using Brazilian sugarcane in jet fuel.

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) will also contribute funds for the project aimed at reducing blamed for global warming, the three parties said in a joint statement.

"The groundbreaking study will evaluate environmental and market conditions associated with the use of renewable jet fuel," the partners said.

The fuel will be produced by US firm Amyris, they said.

Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho, leader of the IDB Sustainable Aviation Biofuels Initiative, said that emerging renewable jet fuel technologies have the potential to reduce "significantly," pointing to Brazil's success in using to substitute for gasoline.

"This study will examine the overall potential for sustainable, large-scale production of alternative jet fuels made from sugarcane," he said.

The study, led by ICONE, a research think-tank in Brazil, is the first to be financed under an IDB grant announced in June to promote development of a sustainable bio-jet-fuels industry, the development bank said.

Environmental group World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is to serve as an independent reviewer and adviser.

Boeing said the collaborative research into the "cane-to-jet pathway" is important for diversifying aviation’s fuel supplies, and also builds on strong US-Brazil renewable energy cooperation.

"With aviation biofuel now approved for use in commercial jetliners, understanding and ensuring the sustainability of sources that can feed into region supply chains is critical and Brazil has a strong role to play there," said Billy Glover, Boeing vice president of environment and aviation policy.

"Our planet derives no benefit from a fuel that merely replaces current fossil fuels. This study will help us replace fossil fuels with a renewable that surpasses both technical and sustainability criteria," said John Melo, chief executive of Amyris.

The California-based Amyris opened a sugar-based fuel facility in Brazil, in Campinas, in the southeastern state of Sao Paulo, in 2009.

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that_guy
not rated yet Jul 26, 2011
1. lets start by laying out the basics. aircraft are very dependent on the energy density of their fuel. Lower the energy density a little, and because of weight and reduced power, you have a larger effect on fuel economy. It needs to be significantly cheaper than kerosene, or comperable in power. (Which is in doubt considering ethanol use in road vehicles...lower fuel economy, increased wear...)

So...What numbers or pre-conditions in their preliminary work led them to consider that there might be room for a feasable scenario soon...? That's all I'm asking.

2. Who is calling this a jet fuel study? Judging from what I see, it's an aeronautical fuel study. It's not a jet fuel study until it's a study involving primarily jets...which the picture and caption are not...Jet engines and piston propellor engines are two completely different animals.
Agaveproject
not rated yet Jul 30, 2011
Amyris, Gevo and LS9, among others, have developed technology to produce sugar-based biojet fuel (not ethanol).
As far as I know, Amyris will test sugarcane based biojet fuel in April. The certification process is already on its way. In one to two years planes will be flying with sugar-based biofuels.

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