A body-centric perspective

Jul 06, 2011
A body-centric perspective
Wearable textile antenna worn on the back

Dr. Dominique Paul, a Research Fellow in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, was invited to present her work on wearable electronics at the recent Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Body-Centric Wireless Communications Conference 2011.

The event, held on 27 June, showcased the latest research on next-generation body-centric communications – networks worn on the human body.

Future communication systems will be worn on clothing rather than held in the hand as smart phones are nowadays, and will be made possible due to cutting-edge advancements in wearable electronics. Dr. Paul, from the Centre for Communications Research (CCR), specialises in the design of antennas that can be integrated into textiles through electromagnetic numerical simulation. Applications range from smart clothing for sportswear, to soldiers’ and emergency workers’ outfits, and to monitoring devices for healthcare and telemedicine.

Professor Joe McGeehan, Director of CCR, said: "We are delighted that Dr. Paul has had the opportunity to present an invited paper on her novel research is this key area. Wireless networks worn on the human body will become more pervasive, particularly in applications such as medical sensor networks for an ageing population and healthcare."

Explore further: Making smartphone browsing 20% faster while reducing power consumption by 40%

More information: A webcast of Dr. Paul’s presentation on ‘Conformal FDTD models of wearable antennas’ is available online.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Testing the T-shirt antenna

Jun 30, 2011

NPL worked with BAE Systems Advanced Technology Centre, to measure the pattern and efficiency of radiation emitted from next generation wearable antennas embedded in T-shirts.

SFU develops super sensor devices

Feb 22, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Imagine being able to adjust your home furnace, check whether your arteries are plugging up and pinpoint the location of your child, all with a tap of the same quarter-sized brooch.

New research could help protect frontline troops

Nov 04, 2009

A team of researchers at Queen's University Belfast's Centre for Secure Information Technologies (CSIT) is working to develop futuristic communications systems that could help protect frontline troops.

Smartphones -- the grip of death

Feb 28, 2011

New research by academics in the University of Bristol's Centre for Communications Research has highlighted the problems of reduced sensitivity in wireless communications, along with developing new solutions to overcome the ...

Versatile ultra-low power biomedical signal processor

Feb 25, 2011

At today’s International Solid-State Circuit Conference (ISSCC2011), imec, Holst Centre and NXP present a versatile ultra-low power biomedical signal processor, CoolBio, meeting the requirements of future ...

Recommended for you

Is sending shoppers ads by Bluetooth just a bit creepy?

Oct 17, 2014

Using Bluetooth wireless networking to send information to nearby smartphones, beacon technology could transform how retailers engage with their customers. But customers will notice how their information is ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

thales
not rated yet Jul 15, 2011