A body-centric perspective

Jul 06, 2011
A body-centric perspective
Wearable textile antenna worn on the back

Dr. Dominique Paul, a Research Fellow in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, was invited to present her work on wearable electronics at the recent Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Body-Centric Wireless Communications Conference 2011.

The event, held on 27 June, showcased the latest research on next-generation body-centric communications – networks worn on the human body.

Future communication systems will be worn on clothing rather than held in the hand as smart phones are nowadays, and will be made possible due to cutting-edge advancements in wearable electronics. Dr. Paul, from the Centre for Communications Research (CCR), specialises in the design of antennas that can be integrated into textiles through electromagnetic numerical simulation. Applications range from smart clothing for sportswear, to soldiers’ and emergency workers’ outfits, and to monitoring devices for healthcare and telemedicine.

Professor Joe McGeehan, Director of CCR, said: "We are delighted that Dr. Paul has had the opportunity to present an invited paper on her novel research is this key area. Wireless networks worn on the human body will become more pervasive, particularly in applications such as medical sensor networks for an ageing population and healthcare."

Explore further: Say it with light: Using LEDs to move data faster

More information: A webcast of Dr. Paul’s presentation on ‘Conformal FDTD models of wearable antennas’ is available online.

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