Atlantis to dock with space station on final flight

July 10, 2011

The crew of Atlantis prepared to link up with the International Space Station Sunday as part of the final mission of the US space shuttle program.

The space shuttle, which began its journey to the station on Friday, is carrying a crew of four US astronauts who will help re-stock the orbiting lab.

On Saturday, the Atlantis crew inspected the craft's thermal protection system, the outer barrier that protects it from the searing heat upon re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, in preparation for Sunday's docking at the orbiting ISS.

Crew members used the shuttles "and 50-foot (15-meter) long orbiter boom to get a close up look at the shuttles wing leading edges and nose cap," NASA said in a statement.

Cameras on the end of the boom took close-up pictures of the thermal protection system, made in part of a composite material known as reinforced carbon carbon (RCC).

"Imagery experts on the ground will comb through the data to make sure that the heat shield remains in good shape," the statement said.

The inspections "are standard operations to ascertain if there was any ascent damage to the vehicles heat shield tiles," NASA said.

In February 2003 the was destroyed upon re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, and a panel of experts concluded that a heat shield tile on the craft's wing was damaged at blast-off, fatally compromising the craft's re-entry protection.

The Atlantis shuttle mission marks the end of an era in . The United States will soon have no spacecraft capable of taking astronauts into orbit, leaving Russia's three-seat as the sole taxi to the ISS.

At least 750,000 people descended on Florida Friday to catch a glimpse of history, braving snarled traffic and warnings of stormy weather that had briefly threatened to postpone the mission.

Once the shuttle retires, astronauts will be limited to catching rides to the ISS aboard the at a cost of $51 million per ticket.

As many as 8,000 people, mostly at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida are being laid off with the closure of the shuttle program.

In the days leading up to Atlantis's last launch, NASA fended off criticism over the lack of an immediate successor to the shuttle and showed off the design of the Orion space capsule, the basis for a multipurpose crew vehicle that may some day travel to deep space.

"I don't see this is as the end of the golden era," said NASA associate administrator for space operations Bill Gerstenmaier after the launch. "I see it as a transition."

Private companies like SpaceX, Boeing and Sierra Nevada are competing to become the first to build a next-generation space capsule to take astronauts and cargo to the orbiting research lab.

But those plans are not likely to come to fruition before 2015 at the earliest.

Former president Richard Nixon ordered the shuttle program in the 1970s, and the first was launched in 1981.

Explore further: NASA green lights April 5 launch of Discovery

Related Stories

NASA green lights April 5 launch of Discovery

March 27, 2010

The US space agency NASA gave its thumbs up for the April 5 launch of the shuttle Discovery, which will take a seven-member crew, including a Japanese astronaut, to the International Space Station (ISS).

NASA inspects damaged tiles on shuttle

May 18, 2011

NASA is examining seven heat shield tiles that appear to have been damaged during the shuttle Endeavour's ascent into orbit, but the US space agency said Wednesday there was no cause for concern.

Atlantis blasts off on end-of-era spaceflight

July 8, 2011

Atlantis blazed a path into history Friday as it rocketed off the launch pad for a final time, marking the last-ever liftoff of the 30-year-old American space shuttle program.

Atlantis crew inspects 'thermal protection system'

July 9, 2011

The Atlantis crew on Saturday inspected the craft's thermal protection system, the outer barrier that protects it from the searing heat upon re-entry into the earth's atmosphere, NASA said.

Recommended for you

Using gravitational waves to catch runaway black holes

June 30, 2016

Black holes are the most powerful gravitational force in the Universe. So what could cause them to be kicked out of their host galaxies? Cambridge researchers have developed a method for detecting elusive 'black hole kicks.'

Hubble captures vivid auroras in Jupiter's atmosphere

June 30, 2016

Astronomers are using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study auroras—stunning light shows in a planet's atmosphere—on the poles of the largest planet in the Solar System, Jupiter. This observation programme is supported ...

Rosetta, Philae to reunite on comet for Sept 30 mission end

June 30, 2016

After nearly two years apart, Europe's Rosetta spacecraft will join stranded robot probe Philae on September 30 on the icy surface of a comet hurtling through space, their eternal resting place, mission control said Thursday.

Measuring the shape of the Milky Way's black hole

June 24, 2016

At the heart of our galaxy's center is SagA*, a supermassive black hole containing about four million solar-masses of material. SgrA* is relatively faint, unlike the supermassive black holes in some other galaxies. This is ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.