More than a third of US adults own smartphones: study

July 11, 2011
A man looks at a Motorola Atrix smartphone at the 2011 International Consumer Electronics Show. A Pew Research Center study indicated that 35 percent of US adults own smartphones as the Internet is increasingly being accessed using gadgets on the go.

A Pew Research Center study released on Monday indicated that 35 percent of US adults own smartphones as the Internet is increasingly being accessed using gadgets on the go.

A quarter of US smartphone owners claimed to do most of their online browsing from mobile devices, according to the study conducted from April 26 to May 22 of this year.

The research found that 35 percent of smartphone owners had handsets powered by Google-backed Android software, while and Blackberry devices were each used by 24 percent of those interviewed.

Android smartphones were common among young people and African-Americans. Blackberry and iPhone users tended to have relatively high income and education levels, according to the study.

Overall, smartphones were owned by the financially well-off, college graduates, non-whites, and people younger than 45 years old, the research concluded.

Explore further: Over 160,000 Android devices sold every day: Google CEO

Related Stories

Android tops iPhone in US: comScore

February 7, 2011

Google's Android surged past Apple's iPhone last quarter and is closing in on the Blackberry as the most popular smartphone platform in the United States, market tracking firm comScore said Monday.

Android smartphones widen lead in US market

May 7, 2011

Smartphones powered by Google software widened their lead on BlackBerry handsets in the US market during the first three months of the year, industry tracker comScore reported on Friday.

Recommended for you

Facebook ready to test giant drone for Internet service

July 30, 2015

Facebook says it will begin test flights later this year for a solar-powered drone with a wingspan as big as a Boeing 737, in the next stage of its campaign to deliver Internet connectivity to remote parts of the world.

Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors

July 30, 2015

Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.