Twitter automates link shrinking to cut characters

June 8, 2011

(AP) -- Twitter is offering to automatically shrink your links so they fit within the service's 140-character limit.

Link-shortening services such as bit.ly convert long Web links into a handful of characters. Normally you'd convert the link elsewhere and copy the shortened form to the message.

Now, you'll be able to do that all from the message box at Twitter.com. After you type a link, Twitter will automatically shorten it to 19 characters, starting with "t.co." Unlike other shortening services, though, readers of the won't see the "t.co" version but the actual website you'd be going to, whether it's .com or a personal blog.

The automatic shrinking feature will be rolled out to users over time. People who prefer another shortening service can still use it the old way.

Explore further: Short Web address market shrinks: tr.im trimmed

0 shares

Related Stories

Short Web address sites form link archiving group

August 17, 2009

(AP) -- The growing popularity of Web-address shortening services like bit.ly creates the potential for a bevy of broken links should one of the providers suddenly cease operations.

Shortened links may not be as malicious as thought

April 5, 2010

(AP) -- Link-shortening services such as TinyURL seem ideal for criminals because they can disguise the names of malicious sites. Yet on Twitter - one of the most popular places for them - they may not be nearly as malicious ...

Recommended for you

How to curb emissions? Put a price on carbon

September 3, 2015

Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions.

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

September 1, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power ...

For these 'cyborgs', keys are so yesterday

September 4, 2015

Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.